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Enclave by Ann Aguirre (Razorland #1)

Enclave by Ann Aguirre (Razorland #1)Enclave by Ann Aguirre
Series: Razorland
Published by Macmillan, Square Fish on April 11th 2011
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 259
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
Goodreads
four-stars

Enclave was a really awesome read about ZOMBIES. I’m pretty obsessed with zombies at the moment, so this was facilitating my zombie love because they were a significant part of the novel. However it wasn’t like most zombie apocalypse books, where the entire book is about surviving the zombies. Zombies, or “Freaks”, were a big part of the plot, but there were a lot of other obstacles the characters had to overcome.

Deuce is part of an enclave underground and has been training her whole life to become a Huntress. They patrol the grounds, learn to fight and keep the Freaks away from the enclave. No one in the enclave has been aboveground because if they do, they believe they will die.

Deuce reminded me of Katniss, because of her slight unfeeling nature toward some things. She’s slightly ignorant towards people and doesn’t have a lot of emotional intelligence. However, I did like her, and simply felt sorry for her in some instances. She’s been living underground her whole life, and random things would crop up sometimes that seem obvious to us, but a revelation to her. Things she never knew about, like what chocolate was. C’mon. NOT KNOWING WHAT CHOCOLATE IS. I have to admit, that stood out to me more than some of the other instances.

The entire community of the enclave is corrupt and downright awful. Understandably though. None of the people brought up there were taught differently. Still, I did wonder why none of them actually though for themselves! Their whole community was a bunch of sheep, not questioning anything. The fact that they were underground, meant they had no idea of what was surreal. They could have been told marshmallows fell from the sky and believed it.

This is a book I’ve not heard much about but really recommend. The world is completely different and interesting. I read a whole book on it, yet I could read two more and still be fascinated. The characters have room for growth, and even developed in this instalment. I’m really interested to read about how Deuce changes, but also the more minor characters. There’s even enough romance to satisfy me, but again, there was this reminder of The Hunger Games and similarities between the two. I’m not going to delve into that now though, it’s complicated to explain, but if you’ve read it, comment and tell me if you understand! The only thing that was really lacking throughout Enclave was humour. The lack of humour gave this novel a brittle edge, and was hard to read at times because it’s so bleak.

Rating: 4 stars.

 

four-stars

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Review: Under the Never Sky by Veronica Rossi (Under the Never Sky #1)

Review: Under the Never Sky by Veronica Rossi (Under the Never Sky #1)Under the Never Sky by Veronica Rossi
Series: Under the Never Sky #1
Published by Atom on January 3rd 2012
Genres: Dystopia, Sci-Fi, Young Adult
Pages: 374
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
Goodreads
three-half-stars
WORLDS KEPT THEM APART.

DESTINY BROUGHT THEM TOGETHER.

Aria has lived her whole life in the protected dome of Reverie. Her entire world confined to its spaces, she's never thought to dream of what lies beyond its doors. So when her mother goes missing, Aria knows her chances of surviving in the outer wasteland long enough to find her are slim.

Then Aria meets an outsider named Perry. He's searching for someone too. He's also wild - a savage - but might be her best hope at staying alive.

If they can survive, they are each other's best hope for finding answers.

Under the Never Sky took a while to draw me in, the entire premise was quite complicated and not very well explained. It jumped right in with bewildering lingo like ‘Realms’  which left me confused. Some of the world intricacies were never explained and I have no idea how the Earth got into this weird Sci-Fi situation or if it’s a different dimension entirely. However, despite this initial bump, at about page 130, Under the Never Sky got good.  Really good.

I loved the idea of having ‘Realms’. They are virtual worlds that humans live in and you can change to different Realms with a single thought. For example, you can go to a Forest Realm for lunch and then a Beach Realm in the blink of an eye. Everything is virtual, so the experience is not quite the same as real life, but the people who live there try and make everything appear, feel and taste as life-like as possible. Our main protagonist, Aria, is from the Realms and soon finds that the Realms have done no justice to real life. It was amusing to read about her reactions to things very common to us, like fires, which mystified her. Also, she kept collecting rocks, because they’re unique shapes and sizes on earth, whereas in the Realms they are formulated and often boring and the same.

Meanwhile on Earth, humans live in Tribes, with a leader called a Blood Lord. Humans have been set back a hundred or so years. They are living in stone huts and finding it hard to survive with enough food through the winter. Peregrine is our main hero, and when his nephew goes missing, Peregrine sets off to save him. Then Aria gets thrown out of the Realms, and her and Peregrine strike a deal to help each other.

Under the Never Sky is told in dual points of view, following both Perry and Aria, it was enjoyable to read about both of their lives and the contrast of how they live and their thoughts about each other. To begin with, they share an animosity towards each other because Aria thinks Perry’s a savage, and Perry thinks Aria’s a spoilt brat. Both of those opinions hold some truth. But of course their relationship continues to develop and drama ensues.

It’s a mix or science fiction and Dystopia, which was interesting to read. I really enjoyed this book, although I don’t think it was initially explained in the best way, I was still very taken by the writing and the unique premise. I highly recommend this series, and urge you to get past the fairly boring and slightly confusing first 100 pages, because the next 250 are a real gem.

Rating: 3.5 Stars, but only because of the beginning, otherwise I seriously loved it and I will definitely be carrying on with the series.

three-half-stars

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Review: Acid by Emma Pass

Review: Acid by Emma PassAcid by Emma Pass
Series:
Published by Corgi Childrens on 25 April 2013
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 431
Format: Paperback
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
2113. In Jenna Strong’s world, ACID – the most brutal, controlling police force in history – rule supreme. No throwaway comment or muttered dissent goes unnoticed – or unpunished. And it was ACID agents who locked Jenna away for life, for a bloody crime she struggles to remember.

The only female inmate in a violent high-security prison, Jenna has learned to survive by any means necessary. And when a mysterious rebel group breaks her out, she must use her strength, speed and skill to stay one step ahead of ACID – and to uncover the truth about what really happened on that dark night two years ago.
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I really enjoyed this Dystopia world, I thought it was interesting and engaging. Jenna is the protagonist and I really enjoyed the amount of times she changes identities and goes undercover, because it’s not something I read often in YA. Surgeons entirely change her face’s appearance at least twice, which seemed offhanded and casual; and even though it’s possible to do so in the present day, I’ll admit that it threw me a bit. Jenna is your typical Dystopia heroine–strong, and fought for her beliefs to stay alive. She didn’t really have any choice. In the second half is where I found Jenna to be the most brave and courageous, I can’t say anything without spoiling it, but it was a really interesting plot twist that changed my out-look on the story.

The plot and overall conflict of Acid was intriguing, but I think at times the characters were lacking a little bit in the depth department, simply because everything was fast paced and happening so quickly. It never really slowed down enough to focus on minor details or the complexity of Jenna or anyone else’s character. However, it was a gripping novel, full of twists and turns, with scene changes and also slow, tense parts that kept me reading.

There is a little bit of romance, but not huge amounts, but enough to satisfy me, because I like my under-lying romance. If there were any more, it would seem forced, as there aren’t many opportunities in Acid for there to be many romantic scenes.

Acid is very fast-paced, there’s always something happening and Jenna is always on the move or undercover. The Dystopia world was fairly extensive, and had very interesting elements to it. Once reached the age of 16, teenagers are required to be partnered with a random person of the opposite sex to live with the rest of their lives and they’re called ‘Life Partners’. Eventually, the couple get a notification to say that they are ready to have a baby, and that’s that. People don’t think anything of it, it’s simply the norm. Note: opposite sex, no same-sex relations at all, and it always makes me sad to see society go back a couple of steps from where we are now. I find that in a lot of Dystopia books, life is restricted like this and the new government controls them. Every aspect of people’s lives were monitored and listened to, with England having been completely cut off from any other countries and all citizens ignorant on what life is like outside of our small country.

It was extremely refreshing to read a book set in the UK, and I was so glad to read another UKYA book! Lucy at Queen of Contemporary is always insisting we read more UKYA books, and I know I don’t read enough. I’m trying to support books written by UK authors, as well as books that aren’t American, because I read a lot of books written by American authors.

I seriously recommend Acid, if you’re on a Dystopia trip right now. It is a standalone novel, so no pesky wait for another book; it’s gripping and you don’t have to invest loads into it, because you know it’s going to wrap-up nicely.

Rating: 4 Stars

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Review: Legend by Marie Lu (Legend #1)

Review: Legend by Marie Lu (Legend #1)Legend by Marie Lu
Series: Legend
Published by Penguin on November 29th 2011
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 304
Format: Paperback
Source: Library
Goodreads
four-half-stars
What was once the western United States is now home to the Republic, a nation perpetually at war with its neighbors. Born into an elite family in one of the Republic’s wealthiest districts, fifteen-year-old June is a prodigy being groomed for success in the Republic’s highest military circles. Born into the slums, fifteen-year-old Day is the country’s most wanted criminal. But his motives may not be as malicious as they seem.

From very different worlds, June and Day have no reason to cross paths—until the day June’s brother, Metias, is murdered and Day becomes the prime suspect. Caught in the ultimate game of cat and mouse, Day is in a race for his family’s survival, while June seeks to avenge Metias’s death. But in a shocking turn of events, the two uncover the truth of what has really brought them together, and the sinister lengths their country will go to keep its secrets.
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Oh look, another Dystopian book that I loved. Legend was really fantastic!

I loved June and Day, there were a fantastic combination. June was very determined once her brother died and that was something that I admired. I completely related to the relationship with her brother, and actually wished we’d seen more of their relationship but he dies quite early on.  June is the only one to have ever gotten a perfect score of 1500 on her test, which ensures what direction her life will take. She’s practically a genius, and also rather arrogant at the start, but she learns more about herself as the novel goes on, which makes her re-evaluate her opinions on certain things and changes her. Throughout Legend, she makes perceptive observations and can detect things the average person can’t, that let us piece together different aspects about a person’s character. She was very capable, and soon realised how corrupt the Republic was, because she had to work directly with them. I always find it hard in these novels to believe that everyone, including all soldiers, are evil. However, Thomas had exactly the same awful beliefs as everyone else and I really wanted him to be different–but he wasn’t and I now hate his character. At some points, Legend has a detective novel likeness to it, with Metias’ death she’s left with a lot of questions, and this is where her genius nature comes into play.

Legend is told in two perspectives–June and Day’s, and I loved reading both of those views. In other books, I sometimes get bored of one person or their situation, and scan that chapter, but I was always captivated no matter the point of view. It was incredibly interesting and funny to see each character from each others point of view.

Day is so funny, and incredibly brave protecting his family, we get a couple of flashbacks with him which made his character more complete and I liked the insight into his past. I’m interested to know more about his past and June’s, because there are a few loose ends, especially involving June’s parents.

I loved the ending, and I’m really excited about where this series is going. The third and final book is releasing in November, so I need to read Prodigy before then!

This book has action, romance, corruption, death and I loved every second of it. It’s highly recommended if you’re in love with Dystopia’s at the moment.

Rating: 4.5 Stars

four-half-stars

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Review: Angelfall by Susan Ee

Angelfall by Susan Ee
Series: Penryn and the End of Days #1
Published by Hodder and Stoughton on May 23rd 2013
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 336
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
three-half-stars

It’s been six weeks since angels of the apocalypse descended to demolish the modern world. Street gangs rule the day while fear and superstition rule the night. When warrior angels fly away with a helpless little girl, her seventeen-year-old sister Penryn will do anything to get her back.

Anything, including making a deal with an enemy angel.

Raffe is a warrior who lies broken and wingless on the street. After eons of fighting his own battles, he finds himself being rescued from a desperate situation by a half-starved teenage girl.

Traveling through a dark and twisted Northern California, they have only each other to rely on for survival. Together, they journey toward the angels’ stronghold in San Francisco where she’ll risk everything to rescue her sister and he’ll put himself at the mercy of his greatest enemies for the chance to be made whole again.

I’m not keen on Angels novels, I don’t know why but every Angel book I’ve read leaves something to be desired–I’m looking at you Hush Hush and Fallen. The premise to Angelfall was unusual, because Angels caused the post-apocalyptic world and are evil. I got a little freaked out by how awful Angels were in this book!
It is quite uncommon that I love the heroine and get a little annoyed with the love-interest. However, I found Raffe was luke-warm and then cold towards Penryn. Presumably so he didn’t develop feelings for her and to ‘protect’ her, but honestly, it became annoying. However, I loved Penryn’s independence because she’d learnt martial arts and could protect herself, despite being a little lost.
There are many cliché’s that pulled this novel down for me in rating, most of them involving Raffe. Angelfall isn’t entirely to blame however, it’s also the other Young Adult books churning out the same clichéd stories that are wearing me down.
An example of a cliché was that Raffe was described as ‘Adonis like’ and Penryn was ‘boring looking’. I find this is the case with a lot of Young Adult novels, with the stunningly attractive male falling in love with the average-looking female. I like reading about confident girls, and I don’t need the guys to be God-like in appearance to keep me interested.

Me: “What? This guy doesn’t look like a Greek God?” *shuts book* “Nope, not good enough.”

Raffe was sometimes unreasonably rude to Penryn and I felt like she was too kind towards him and it would’ve made things more interesting if she’d defended herself more.
I empathised with Raffe and his situation, considering a part of him had literally been ripped away from him. I did like Raffe, and in some scenes of the book, my heart melted a little. However, he brings up quite a few of my annoyances and pet-peeves, that I could not ignore.
Penryn was on a mission; her wheelchair-bound sister had gotten kidnapped and Penryn has to save her from evil Angels who’d taken over the world. Oh, and she’s also got a crazy mother who likes talking to demons and showing up at the most inappropriate times. Penryn was fantastic, I really understood her–she was a normal teenager who didn’t entirely know what she was doing, but wasn’t completely helpless. She had a mission and no one was going to stop her, I admired her determination.
Towards the end climax, I was completely shocked and the plot really thickens from there till the end. It was a very open ending, because I have no idea what’s going to happen in the next installment, but it stopped on a satisfying, positive note. I’m interested to see where this story-line goes, especially for Penryn’s sake.
I didn’t love, love Angelfall, but I really enjoyed it and would definitely recommend it.
This book gave me tons to think about, there were a lot of things that did not cater to my personal preferences, yet I still managed to enjoy it, which says something!

I’m wavering, but I’m going to go with 3.5 Stars. Recommended if you like Angels, and hot n’ cold relationships.
If anyone has a recommendation for a good Angel book, let me know. I’ve tried Hush Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick and Fallen by Lauren Kate. I didn’t like them.

three-half-stars

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Release Day Review: All Our Yesterdays by Cristin Terrill (All Our Yesterdays #1)

All Our Yesterdays by Cristin Terrill
Series: All Our Yesterdays #1
Published by Bloomsbury, Bloomsbury Children's on 1st August 2013
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 384
Format: Paperback
Source: Given From Publisher
four-half-stars

 Amazon|Goodreads

  •  
  • “You have to kill him.” Imprisoned in the heart of a secret military base, Em has nothing except the voice of the boy in the cell next door and the list of instructions she finds taped inside the drain.Only Em can complete the final instruction. She’s tried everything to prevent the creation of a time machine that will tear the world apart. She holds the proof: a list she has never seen before, written in her own hand. Each failed attempt in the past has led her to the same terrible present—imprisoned and tortured by a sadistic man called the doctor while war rages outside. Marina has loved her best friend James since the day he moved next door when they were children. A gorgeous, introverted science prodigy from one of America’s most famous families, James finally seems to be seeing Marina in a new way, too. But on one disastrous night, James’s life crumbles apart, and with it, Marina’s hopes for their future. Now someone is trying to kill him. Marina will protect James, no matter what. Even if it means opening her eyes to a truth so terrible that she may not survive it. At least not as the girl she once was. All Our Yesterdays is a wrenching, brilliantly plotted story of fierce love, unthinkable sacrifice, and the infinite implications of our every choice.

After I read this my head was left spinning—as anyone who follows me on Twitter will know. I tweeted about this…a lot. All Our Yesterdays is a time-travel Dystopia, and I wasn’t exactly sure what to expect, but it did not disappoint.

There are mainly two points of view, Em and Marina. Marina is Em’s past self. Em goes back in time to stop the making of Cassandra (the time machine) to a time where Marina is inhabiting. I loved the way they were very different, yet ultimately still the same person. Marina is far more superficial and trying to fit in with her friends, having a teenage love for James. She doesn’t get enough attention from her parents and is trying to be a ‘normal’ teenager.

Em is far more grounded, she has figured out how to love herself, but she’s haunted. She’s been through so much after the making of Cassandra. She’s been tortured and left in a cell. Em doesn’t want Marina to have to go through what she has gone through, and sets out with her partner to stop the making of Cassandra. Em’s love interest is hilarious, he’s the perfect blend of cockiness and sexiness. Such a great addition to my fictional boyfriends! Which there are shamefully many of.

We also got flashbacks from the time when Em was running away from the corruption, and the awful memories of what happened to those she loved. These flashbacks filled in the blanks and made the story a lot more interesting.

I went in All Our Yesterdays without knowing anything at all, I didn’t even read the blurb! Instead of confusing me, it actually made everything more interesting. The plot twists are shocking, delightful, and at times cry-worthy. Seriously, read page 364 and get back to me, because that was the most awful thing in the entire book.

I wanted to see more of the Dystopian world, when most of the book is set in today’s world. It was enforced many times throughout the novel how corrupted the world had become with the making of Cassandra, yet we didn’t see it as much I would have liked. I’m hoping this is going to be in the next instalment.

I definitely recommend this book to Dystopia lovers, or even people starting out with Dystopia! I’m left empty without the next book, which is not out until 2014!

Rating; 4.5 stars

four-half-stars

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Review: Tent City by Kelly Van Hull

Tent City by Kelly Van Hull
Series: Tent City #1
on March 10th 2013
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 270
Format: eBook
Source: Given From Author
three-half-stars
Tent City

Goodreads

After a devastating plague, introverted 17-year-old Dani Campbell and her family find themselves living in a very different America, one run by a cult-like leader, who forces children to move to “safety camps” designed to protect the human race. Encouraged to flee by her parents, Dani and her five-year-old brother seek refuge in the Black Hills of South Dakota. On the run with danger around every corner, Dani must fight to ensure their survival in this new world while trying to unmask the mystery of how it all came to be

Danielle, her friend Kit, and her brother Brody, escape the chaos of society and the soon impending ‘safety camps’  children are forced to live in. Tent City was an enjoyable Dystopian read that had me interested from page 1. Dani grew throughout Tent City, both physically and mentally, she seemed so much more capable by the end of the book, and I found that satisfying. She doesn’t sit around, something happens to spur her into action and train, so she can protect herself and those she loves.

I wasn’t quite sure what to make of the love triangle between Bentley, Jack and Dani. I knew it was coming. Romance is not a major aspect in Tent City, things are more focused on survival, but it’s undeniably there. It creeps up on you, and I had a definite favourite between two. Jack was swoon-worthy, and had a really sweet relationship with Brody. Secrets and mystery encased both Jack and Bentley, which made them both more appealing, but also quite infuriating. I kept waiting for answers, some of which I figured out and some of which were revealed. There were a couple of loose ends and the ending was quite sudden.

The relationship between Dani and her little brother, Brody, was really cute. Dani did everything she could to protect him, and I knew, she would do anything for him if it came to it. I didn’t entirely relate to her situation, because I’m the youngest and have two older brothers, but I understood the need to protect those you love. It was always her first priority, yet her constant worrying didn’t annoy me, when it has before in previous books.

The world was not the most extensive Dystopia ever, but I don’t think it was meant to be. I liked that it was a cross between natural disaster and our—humans—reaction to it. The majority of the book is set in Tent City, which made it less exciting, but left room to develop the setting and the ideas involving Tent City. I liked the always underlying problem of survival, and I especially loved the waterfall scenes!

The end left me waiting for more, because I wasn’t satisfied with the loose ends and the things that were left. Events were definitely set up for a book 2, and I’d be interested to see what happens– especially with the romance!

Rating; 3.5 stars

three-half-stars

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Review: Delirium by Lauren Oliver (Delirium #1)

Delirium by Lauren Oliver
Series: Delirium #1
Published by Hodder and Stoughton on 4th August 2011
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 416
Format: Hardcover
Source: Library
four-half-stars

 

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks (4 Aug 2011)
  • ISBN-10: 0340980931

They say that the cure for love will make me happy and safe forever. And I’ve always believed them. 

Until now. 

Now everything has changed. Now, I’d rather be infected with love for the tiniest sliver of a second than live a hundred years suffocated by a lie.

There was a time when love was the most important thing in the world. People would go to the end of the earth to find it. They would tell lies for it. Even kill for it. 

Then, at last, they found the cure.

 

“Symptoms of Amor Deliria Nervosa
PHASE ONE:
-preoccupation; difficulty focusing
-dry mouth
-perspiration, sweaty palms
-fits of dizziness and disorientation
-reduced mental awareness; racing thoughts; impaired reasoning skills”

Lena lives in a world where love is forbidden and considered a disease. No one is allowed to love anyone or anything–not even their children–and at the age of 18 everyone has a brain surgery that gets rid of their ability to love. Lena is counting down the days until she has the procedure, to make her like everyone else. After she has the surgery, she will be paired with someone who is scientifically compatible with her, and they will have as many children as they’re financially able.

Her mother was illegally uncured, and so different from everyone else. Having the procedure is a huge step in proving Lena’s nothing like her mother and that she’s normal. Lena’s mum didn’t do ordinary ‘mum stuff’, she used to play with Lena and her sister, kiss their bruises when they tripped over. And then she killed herself, after the third time the government tried to cure her unsuccessfully. Now Lena is living with her aunt who has tried her best to steer her away from the taint on their family caused by her mother. Except, after spending so long counting down the days until the procedure, Lena is beginning to have doubts. She doesn’t know who she can trust, and can’t decide if what she has been believing all her life is a lie.

“PHASE TWO:
-periods of euphoria; hysterical laughter and heightened energy
-periods of despair; lethargy
-changes in appetite; rapid weight loss or weight gain
-fixation; loss of other interests
-compromised reasoning skills; distortion of reality
-disruption of sleep patterns; insomnia or constant fatigue
-obsessive thoughts and actions
-paranoia; insecurity”

This book is so good, and it really fed my love for Dystopia at the moment. Lena was confused about love–something that was always a rather simple concept in today’s society. Instead of being celebrated, love is feared, and eradicated. Lena notices that everyone who gets cured is not the same afterwards, doesn’t act the same and are rather unseeing and bland. But she doesn’t want to turn out like her mother, she wants to be normal.

I’m a little curious as to how they are doing brain surgery and practically changing people’s personality, or putting a damper on it. I’m not sure if this is going to be addressed in the next book or not, but I’m quite curious, considering the brain is quite fragile and you can’t just take random bits out.

“PHASE THREE (CRITICAL):
-difficulty breathing
-pain in the chest, throat or stomach
-complete breakdown of rational faculties; erratic behavior; violent thoughts and fantasies; hallucinations and delusions
PHASE FOUR (FATAL):
-emotional or physical paralysis (partial or total)
-death”

I really enjoyed Delirium, and I’m disappointed that they are cancelled the TV series they were going to do, as I’d really like to see this and how they would portray the world. Lena was trying to be strong and support her beliefs, except she didn’t really know what they were. Even though Lena had grown up in this world, it was enjoyable discovering the cracks that she’d never considered were there, right along with her. The concept was fascinating, but where a lot of Dystopia’s are primarily about government issues, this was about governmental issues on love. In other words, love takes up a lot of this storyline, and I’m not quite sure how I feel about it. I usually like the romance to take a back-burn or be slow-building—at least in the beginning–but this definitely wasn’t. Be warned, the love in this edged on insta-love, except it was written really well, so well, that I can’t call it insta-love, but it was close.

Just as I thought Lauren Oliver was going to end the series with a lull, there was a massive cliff-hanger ending. I’m ordering the second book tomorrow! Overall, I was captivated by the world and can’t wait to read the next one.

Rating: 4.5 Stars

 

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four-half-stars

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Review: The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey (The Fifth Wave #1)

The Fifth Wave by Rick Yancey
Series: The Fifth Wave #1
Published by Penguin on 7th May 2013
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 480
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
four-half-stars

The Passage meets Ender’s Game in an epic new series from award-winning author Rick Yancey.

After the 1st wave, only darkness remains. After the 2nd, only the lucky escape. And after the 3rd, only the unlucky survive. After the 4th wave, only one rule applies: trust no one.

Now, it’s the dawn of the 5th wave, and on a lonely stretch of highway, Cassie runs from Them. The beings who only look human, who roam the countryside killing anyone they see. Who have scattered Earth’s last survivors. To stay alone is to stay alive, Cassie believes, until she meets Evan Walker. Beguiling and mysterious, Evan Walker may be Cassie’s only hope for rescuing her brother—or even saving herself. But Cassie must choose: between trust and despair, between defiance and surrender, between life and death. To give up or to get up.

Goodreads link

 

I don’t even know where to start on this review. The 5th Wave is an absolute gem and if you haven’t picked it up yet, I seriously suggest you go and do so right now.

The Earth sees an alien mothership and we try to contact them, but they don’t answer. Then, after ten days of silence, the first wave begins. The Others send out an electromagnetic pulse which takes out all forms of electricity, power, and kills half a million people. The second wave is a tsunami that kills everyone within sixty miles of a coastline, which is three billion people. The third wave is in the form of a plague which had a 97% mortality rate and took out more than 3.5 billion people.

‘Sometimes I think I might be the last human on earth’

Seventeen-year-old Cassie—for Cassiopeia–is alone in the world, camping in the woods while she tries to stay alive and away from the Others. She has a backpack of essentials including a teddybear, a tent and her gun.

‘The first rule of surviving the 4th Wave is don’t trust anyone’

Cassie is such a kick-ass character, she knows that she has to stay alone to survive and she does. Until she meets Evan Walker. It’s the only person she’s talked to in months and she can’t help but enjoy the human contact. Cassie is brave and fights for her right to stay on Earth which I loved. She was so strong and she’s only sixteen. She does what she has to do to survive and she keeps her promises, it was a delight to read from her perspective, despite the fact that she is written by a man.

Cassie’s not the only POV though, we also have a few others, who I will not name for fear of spoiling you all. I actually enjoyed their POV just as much as Cassie’s, and loved that all of their storylines were relevant and interlocked at various points in the book.

Young Adult Dystopian is a genre that’s increasingly growing, especially after the release of The Hunger Games. I even hesitate to say it’s the ‘Next Big Thing’ in terms of Young Adult and ‘mainstream’ books. It’s not surprising then, that this book is all over the blogosphere with people exclaiming how much they enjoyed it. I enjoyed it too. I’m starting to read more Dystopian’s and The Fifth Wave was something that was incredibly satisfying and different to read. The premise was different, the characters I felt were realistic. They all had their lives before the invasion and Yancey wrote flash-backs which made them more relatable.

I found the plot twists to be captivating, I thought I knew what was going on and then Yancey would flip the story upside-down and change my perspective. He was really good at making me doubt myself and sometimes even deliberately confused for me to make me think certain things about the situations and the characters.

Overall, a really enjoyable Dystopian read. If you’re looking for something to read in the Dystopian genre, I suggest you take a look, because I thought it was fantastic. Then I realised the second one comes out in Summer! Next year.

I’m hoping to see Rick Yancey in London soon, but he hasn’t posted where he’s going to do the signing!

Rating: 4.5 Stars

four-half-stars

Divergent-divergent-22065564-1680-1050

Review: Divergent by Veronica Roth

Divergent by Veronica Roth
Series: Divergent #1
Published by HarperCollins, HarperCollins Children's Books on February 28th 2012
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 487
Format: Paperback
Source: Library
five-stars

Divergent (Divergent, #1)This book was incredibly intense from beginning to end, there was always something happening and once I got roped in, I didn’t stop reading.

There are five factions in this dystopian world:

Abnegation—the selfless

Erudite—the intelligent

Candor—the honest

Dauntless—the brave

Beatrice was born in Abnegation, and is told never to ask questions, respect your elders, don’t look in the mirror and always help others–no matter the cost to you. She must wear gray robes, so she’s not separating herself from anyone or being individual and to not show much skin. To Beatrice, this never came naturally, and she found herself growing up constantly having to remind herself of these rules. They may seem weird, however Abnegation believe these rules make them utterly selfless. These five factions are how their community live in peace, with no murder and because all the council members are Abnegation, also no corruption.

Beatrice is sixteen and soon she will have the choice of leaving abnegation and joining another faction. That would mean never seeing her family again and being cast out. Before that decision though, her and other sixteen-year-olds to take a test. It is impossible to prepare for and informs their choice considering the type of person they are and how they react in certain situations, however, it’s not compulsory to choose that faction.

The world is so inventive and everything was explained well. With books in dystopian worlds, there’s always the risk of information-dumping, however, I never felt bombarded with information and I was always intrigued. Divergent is compared with The Hunger Games quite a bit, and I would recommend it if you liked The Hunger Games. I think it’s compared because Divergent has factions and lots of ruthless fighting, with corruption. The Hunger Games has districts with ruthless fighting and corruption. However, I believe Roth has brought something different to the table, and once I started to read, I realized that they are very different worlds with completely different characters, but they are both dystopian and that’s where the similarities lie.

I flew through the pages, and before I knew it, I was finished. Page after page, of action, humour and unpredictable things, I was so immersed I didn’t have time to make predictions about how it would end.

The characters were written really well, a few stood out that had a lot of depth and despite the fact this was in first person of Tris’s point of view, I felt huge empathy for other characters.

Tris was amazing, she was strong and took everything in her stride, even when I felt like breaking down and crying for her. She had to grow up a lot, because she wasn’t used to facing the corruption and violence in her comfort home of Abnegation. She was shielded from a lot and just seemed to be going through the motions in life, and then suddenly, she’s jumping from trains and fighting people every single day. Her character was so likeable, she was a little lost, but fighting for what she felt was right and had a witty humour that came out now and again.

The relationship with her father was regrettably distant, he was very self-righteous, but Tris had a lot of support from her mother, who had more secrets than she first appeared to.

Overall it was an engaging book with a strong teenage character, that first drew me in with it’s vivid world.

Rating: 5 Stars

five-stars