Category Archives: Must Read

Review: Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson

Review: Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan MatsonSince You've Been Gone by Morgan Matson
Published by Simon and Schuster Children's on May 6th 2014
Genres: Contemporary, Contemporary Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 449 (hardback)
Format: Paperback
Source: Given From Publisher
four-half-stars
The Pre-Sloane Emily didn't go to parties, she barely talked to guys, she didn't do anything crazy. Enter Sloane, social tornado and the best kind of best friend—the one who yanks you out of your shell. But right before what should have been an epic summer, Sloane just… disappears. No note. No calls. No texts. No Sloane. There’s just a random to-do list. On it, thirteen Sloane-selected-definitely-bizarre-tasks that Emily would never try… unless they could lead back to her best friend.Apple Picking at Night? Okay, easy enough. Dance until Dawn? Sure. Why not? Kiss a Stranger? Wait… what? Getting through Sloane’s list would mean a lot of firsts. But Emily has this whole unexpected summer ahead of her, and the help of Frank Porter (totally unexpected) to check things off. Who knows what she’ll find? Go Skinny Dipping? Um…

*I was given this book for review by Simon and Schuster. This in no way affected my review.*

So this review is far later than I planned :( . One for school and stress and part-time jobs. But also because I thought I’d posted it months ago! Sucks for me. Without further ado, here is my review that should hopefully make you want to read SYBG

SINCE YOU’VE BEEN GOOONE. I CANNOT BREATHE FOR THE FIRST TIIIME.

Since You’ve Been Gone is one of my favourite Summer books and was such a brilliant read. Emily is your average girl who hides behind her best friend Sloane. Yes, the premise is a bit cheesy (aren’t the MCs always boring and average?) but it’s relatable. Sloane abruptly leaves, and Emily is left friend-less all Summer. In the post she recieves a letter from Sloane with a list of things she must do. The list includes things like ‘dance at midnight’ and ‘hug a jamie’, I thought this list brought a fun element to the story and integrated nicely with the romance and ‘finding oneself’ plot.

This writing is along the lines of Gayle Forman’s, in which the romance isn’t the driving point of the novel, but rather Emily finding who she is without hiding behind an enigmatic best friend. I really liked Emily, and I surprisingly liked Sloane. Usually in these type of books where the friend leaves, the MC becomes insufferable and whiny. I know they’re missing their friends, I know. But I’m not reading this book to slog through pages of whining about their loneliness. Sorry.

Emily handles the situation really well–at first she’s a bit thrown–but for someone who’s not massively confident, she isn’t annoying and wimpy. SYBG handles friendships, love, relationships, etc etc–all the stuff I love, if I’m being honest. I adored how the main point of the book was for Emily to bring herself out of her comfort zone and do things she normally wouldn’t do. Summer books are so great because they always feel like they have so many possibilities. Anything could happen. This feeling of endless outcomes and situations is my favourite thing to read.

Emily’s character develops and grows really convincingly as she puts herself in situations she wouldn’t normally put herself in. The minor characters were also really enjoyable, and I learnt to really like them. Frank wasn’t my type of guy, but I warmed to him more than I thought, and himself and Emily were a perfect match. I got really excited for all the chapters and things on the list to get checked off.

SPOILER ALERT SPOILER ALERT : What I didn’t like was how easily Emily’s new ‘friends’ wrote her off. One quick mistake towards the end and these friendships kind of fell apart, what’s that about? Suddenly I didn’t like her new friends nearly as much. Nah. END OF SPOILERS END OF SPOILERS.

This book was an awesome Summer read, and I think it’s a must-read for those who love their Summer books. Despite it now moving into Autumn and cold weather, this Summer book might be necessary to warm you while you’re stuck in the cold.

Rating: 4.5 Stars– Morgan Matson I am following your new releases like a my dog follows food.

four-half-stars

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Review: Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Review: Fangirl by Rainbow RowellFangirl by Rainbow Rowell
Published by My Kinda Book on September 10th 2013
Genres: Contemporary, Contemporary Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 445
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
five-stars
A coming-of-age tale of fan fiction, family and first love. 

Cath is a Simon Snow fan.

Okay, the whole world is a Simon Snow fan . . .

But for Cath, being a fan is her life — and she’s really good at it. She and her twin sister, Wren, ensconced themselves in the Simon Snow series when they were just kids; it’s what got them through their mother leaving.

Reading. Rereading. Hanging out in Simon Snow forums, writing Simon Snow fan fiction, dressing up like the characters for every movie premiere.

Cath’s sister has mostly grown away from fandom, but Cath can’t let go. She doesn’t want to.

Now that they’re going to college, Wren has told Cath she doesn’t want to be roommates. Cath is on her own, completely outside of her comfort zone. She’s got a surly roommate with a charming, always-around boyfriend, a fiction-writing professor who thinks fan fiction is the end of the civilized world, a handsome classmate who only wants to talk about words . . . And she can’t stop worrying about her dad, who’s loving and fragile and has never really been alone.

This book is all kinds of adorable and I loved it. Cath is a fangirl–if you hadn’t worked that out–and this is something many readers can relate to. Cath has a twin and does pretty much everything with Wren, because why wouldn’t she? However, when it comes to university, Wren doesn’t want to be roommates with Cath in a bid to be more independent. I really liked Cath’s character, because she was bookish and shy. She does not want to be rooming with some random person and make eye contact with them…and stuff. Therefore, she’s a little hurt, and turns into a slight recluse in her room.

I related to Cath in a lot of ways, particularly how much she loves books and in this case, a particular series. Except, I’m not her kind of fangirl. I don’t write or read fanfic, however, I do have posters and T-shirts like her. I loved that Cath was a really popular fanfiction writer, and loved writing about those characters.

Cath is a really shy person, and doesn’t really go out of her room at the beginning. She hates the idea of going to the cafeteria for the first time and having nobody to sit with. I get that, but everyone’s in the same boat at this point, so you might as well get it over with. Personally, I would make friends with my roommate or the people in halls, then go sit with them. But Cath just sits in her room and lives on protein bars for a couple of months! Oh my! By the time she makes her way down there, everyone’s already got their groups. So Reagan helps her out, and practically forces her down there to eat. Her roommate Reagan was so awesome. She’s my kind of person 100%. She says what she feels and doesn’t skirt around on bullshit. You know what to expect from her. Some think she’s rude, but really she’s just being real with you. I was more like Reagan personality-wise than Cath, because I’m not as shy as Cath. She’s really good to Cath, she helps her a lot, and without Reagan, Cath would have been a complete hermit. We all need friends that help us in ways we can’t help ourselves.

Then there’s Levi. Levi. Levi. I love Levi. So different from a lot of guy characters currently in YA books. He’s just so happy and smiley and genuine. He supported Cath in a lot of ways, and didn’t push her. He also has a very weird way of learning. He’s a dependant on auditory learning, and listens to lectures instead of reading. But he wasn’t stupid, he just learns in a different way and struggles with how things are taught, so he works harder. I could relate so much to this, except I’m a visual learner, and sometimes I find things harder to process–but I’m not stupid. I’m generally an A/B student, but I identified with Levi a lot in that respect. Cath is naturally a genius, and she gets a little lazy at times. It was so great how Levi just didn’t allow her to be lazy, because he works so hard for his grades and would kill to get amazing grades as easily as her. You go Levi.

Fangirl’s Cath has an obsession with Simon Snow, a character from their world’s Harry Potter. I didn’t grow up with Harry Potter, I’m a bit young and kind of missed the party on that. Therefore, I didn’t entirely relate to that aspect, but the overall Fangirl parts I did relate to.

I really, really loved this book. It was sweet, funny, interesting and something I could completely relate to. I’ve not read anything quite like it, and will re-read this again and again. This will definitely be added to my Contemporary Romance recommendations, and if you haven’t read it, you really need to!

Rating: 5 STARS!!

five-stars

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Review: Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

Review: Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie PerkinsAnna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
Series: Anna and the French Kiss #1
Published by Usborne on December 2nd 2010
Genres: Contemporary Romance, Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 372
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
five-stars
Anna is looking forward to her senior year in Atlanta, where she has a great job, a loyal best friend, and a crush on the verge of becoming more. Which is why she is less than thrilled about being shipped off to boarding school in Paris--until she meets Étienne St. Clair. Smart, charming,beautiful, Étienne has it all...including a serious girlfriend.

But in the City of Light, wishes have a way of coming true. Will a year of romantic near-misses end with their long-awaited French kiss?

Anna and the French Kiss is such a fluffy, warm book that cuddles you when you read it. It’s about an American girl who gets sent to a boarding school in Paris for her last year of school. The boarding school is for Americans, and I loved the Paris aspect of the book. They say Paris is the city of romance, and that added to the magic of the book.

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Anna was such a joy to read. Her voice was hilarious, witty and something I entirely identified with. I just wanted to reach into the book and be her best friend. I read the first page, laughed and knew, just knew  this was going to be a 5 star read. Anna never annoyed me throughout the whole book–which is quite a feat! Her passion for films is like my passion for books, and she has a dream of becoming a film critic and writes on her blog. I could really identify with it, the way she would escape off to different cinema’s in Paris and watch old films. She jumps out of her comfort zone and into an entirely different country with, actually, not much complaining. Which is good, because no one wants to read about a big whiner. She embraces Paris a little later in the book and starts to learn French and grow up a little.

St Clair is so awesome and dreamy, he was the perfect mix of humour and sweet personality. He was also frustrating though! I wanted to hit him on the head sometimes because he didn’t know what he wanted! I loved the way they interacted and how genuine St Clair was…I just…dreamy sigh. Together, St Clair and Anna become close friends and explore Paris together, while the tension crackles between them. They didn’t just explore the usual tourist-y places, but also their secret places that made this book different.

Anna and the French Kiss is hilarious, gut-wrenching and amazing. It’s one of the most perfect YA Romances I’ve ever read. I can’t wait to read the next instalment of Lola and the Boy Next Door.

five-stars

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Review: Where She Went by Gayle Forman

Review: Where She Went by Gayle FormanWhere She Went by Gayle Forman
Series: If I Stay #2
Published by Definitions, Random House on April 5th 2011
Genres: Contemporary, Contemporary Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 208
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
Goodreads
five-stars
It's been three years since Mia walked out of Adam's life.

And three years he's spent wondering why.

When their paths cross again in New York City, Adam and Mia are brought back together for one life-changing night.

Adam finally has the opportunity to ask Mia the questions that have been haunting him. But will a few hours in this magical city be enough to lay their past to rest, for good - or can you really have a second chance at first love?

Where She Went is a powerful Contemporary Romance, and it worked so well because it’s the sequel to If I Stay. In If I Stay, Mia’s entire family are killed in a car crash and she is left in a coma. Mia has an out-of-body experience where she sees everything happening in the hospital around her. This is where I grew to adore Mia and her family, and her relationship with Adam. Therefore, it was a complete and utter devastating surprise when I saw in the blurb of the sequel, that the couple had broken up.

Where She Went wouldn’t have been so compelling if I hadn’t known these characters before and deeply cared about them from the beginning. Except, this book explores a fresh concept. Instead of seeing the world and events through Mia’s eyes, the entire book was in Adam’s perspective, not something I was gung-ho about until I read it, and realised how funny and realistic Adam’s character really is.

Like every other person reading the book, I was rooting for the two to patch up their troubles and get on with life. However, matters were not as simple as that. After the accident, Mia of course has been emotionally scarred, and Adam had some input into that. Forman slowly reveals what happened between the two after the accident and how they both (but especially Mia) held a turmoil of emotion surrounding the accident against each other. Pent-up feelings like resentment, blame, fear–all the nitty-gritty stuff–and let me tell you, Forman was not afraid with a little build-up and then confrontation–something that I loved.

I always loved Adam, and even though he’s more troubled and lonely in this book, I felt closer to him. I related to him, and his character was so complex as Forman peeled back the layers one by one. Mia is more distant, but she expresses her emotions and her fury at Adam, and the accident. Even though I wasn’t inside her head, I didn’t need to be.

If I Stay could have been left a stand-alone and I’m sure people choose not to read the sequel. In fact, I walked around for a couple of days before realising there even was a sequel, just assuming Mia and Adam were living happily-ever-after. However, I’m incredibly glad Forman decided to write a follow-up, because it gave the characters more authenticity and rawness that I have honestly never read before. I clearly need to read more of this type of book because I thoroughly enjoyed it.

I urge you to go away and read If I Stay and then embark on Where She Went. It’s perfect for Contemporary Romance lovers who don’t mind getting into gritty and realistic (but incredibly loveable) characters and emotional scenes.

5 Stars–I loved it because it’s incredibly character based and even though the plot was interesting, I was compelled by the depth of characters.

five-stars

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Review: Through the Ever Night by Veronica Rossi (Under the Never Sky #2)

Review: Through the Ever Night by Veronica Rossi (Under the Never Sky #2)Through the Ever Night by Veronica Rossi
Series: Under the Never Sky #2
Published by Atom on January 8th 2013
Genres: Sci-Fi, Young Adult
Pages: 341
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
five-stars
It's been months since Aria learned of her mother's death. 

Months since Perry became Blood Lord of the Tides, and months since Aria last saw him.

Now Aria and Perry are about to be reunited. It's a moment they've been longing for with countless expectations. And it's a moment that lives up to all of them. At least, at first.

Then it slips away. The Tides don't take kindly to former Dwellers like Aria. And the tribe is swirling out of Perry's control. With the Aether storms worsening every day, the only remaining hope for peace and safety is the Still Blue. But does this haven truly exist?

Threatened by false friends and powerful temptations, Aria and Perry wonder, Can their love survive through the ever night?

In this second book in her spellbinding Under the Never Sky trilogy, Veronica Rossi combines fantasy and sci-fi elements to create a captivating adventure-and a love story as perilous as it is unforgettable.(

I loved Through the Ever Night so much, I felt like everything was ratcheted up a notch and the stakes were higher. Even though I adored Under the Never Sky, it’s no secret that I found the beginning confusing, but enjoyed it when it picked up. However Through the Ever Night was a fantastic read all the way through, and one of my favourites of the year. I’m incredibly invested in the main characters, and there are some great minor characters. It annoys me when the world I’m reading revolves around the main characters, and the more minor characters aren’t explored. Through the Ever Night was not like that, a lot of the characters had many layers. Not only that but it has an extensive world, and a thrilling plot. It’s the kind of book that will lure you in and not allow you to process the outer world until you are finished.

Aria has developed so much, and she’s learnt a lot since the last book. She’s adapted to the world really well–she doesn’t whine, and she’s not annoying. She’s a fighter, and I love her for it. I think the dual POV between her and Perry is brilliant, because Peregrine’s POV is so interesting and I adore Aria and Perry’s Romance. Both of them have separate things to deal with, which keeps things fresh and interesting, and means we aren’t following the same boring problems.

As Peregrine introduces Aria to his tribe, his people are wary of a person from the Realms. Peregrine faces a lot of trouble because he’s young and inexperienced–soon the tribe are finding it hard to eat because of the Aether storms. In addition, Talon is still being kept by the Dweller’s and Perry is faced with the awful decision of choosing between the ones he loves and his entire tribe who are relying on him. Perry is so awesome. Together, him and Aria make such an amazing team, with inevitable bumps along the road in their relationship.

Roar is also present and I love him so much! Not only is he hilarious, but it’s great to see a male character who’s friends with the main heroine and isn’t pitifully in love with her. Roar has his own problems, and I wish Rossi would write an entire book about him and Liv. I know there’s a novella (and I can’t wait to read it) but an entire novel would be so much better! I just wish Rossi would gather all of the minor characters and write separate stories about them! When that happens, I know the book must be good.

Rossi has made me love Sci-Fi,  I love this world and I love the characters. Rossi has carried on this captivating world admirably, and I am clutching my keyboard counting down the days until the conclusion to this series releases. If you haven’t read this series, start at Under the Never Sky– the series is so gashdang awesome and a must-read.

Rating: 5 Stars

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Review: If I Stay by Gayle Forman

Review: If I Stay by Gayle FormanIf I Stay by Gayle Forman
Published by Black Swan on Arpil 2nd 2009
Genres: Contemporary, Contemporary Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 201
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought, Library
Goodreads
five-stars
In a single moment, everything changes. Seventeen-year-old Mia has no memory of the accident; she can only recall riding along the snow-wet Oregon road with her family. Then, in a blink, she finds herself watching as her own damaged body is taken from the wreck...

A sophisticated, layered, and heart-achingly beautiful story about the power of family and friends, the choices we all make, and the ultimate choice Mia commands.
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If I Stay is one emotional book. Anyone who’s had experience with grief can relate to the premise (which is pretty much EVERYONE). Forman explores the boundaries between life and death, and the idea of having the choice whether to live or die. Mia is in a car accident with her parents and younger brother, and when her family are killed, Mia stays in a coma. We’re shown Mia’s perspective outside of her comatose body, as she watches events unfold around her and flashbacks are blended seamlessly to show her former life. She has a captivating dilemma of whether it’s worth living. Her family is dead, and she would spend the rest of her life grieving and living without her family. But of course she has hundreds of life prospects to look forward to, as she’s only 17.

From page one, Mia was a character I understood and liked. Maybe it’s because of her sarcastic and dark humor, or the way her character was presented, but she seemed like someone I could be best friends with. Forman has a way of pulling at the heart-strings in a particular way, I never sobbed my heart out, but her writing made me grieve for my own losses and I  teared up a few times. Her family situation was adorable; she had a boyfriend, a best friend, and an amazing talent at cello. There was no huge drama-llama, everything was so incredibly normal. This made the situation easy to relate to and powerful, because it reminds one that life is short and unpredictable.

I love romance in books, and it did play a part in If I Stay. Adam is probably one of the most realistic book boyfriends, and I love him for it. He’s the lead singer and guitarist in a rock band, but it wasn’t as cliche as it sounds. Forman didn’t make him a rock star to make us love him (okay maybe a little bit), but it was also really integral to the story. Music played an important role in the storyline, as it’s how Adam and Mia meet. It was something they were so passionate about and it  worked really well.

I’m not wasn’t a huge fan of contemporary, and honestly the genre has annoyed me at times. However, If I Stay has opened my eyes to the genre and made me see it in a completely different light. I loved the characters in this book, I loved the story line and the events. I’m so glad I picked it up, and will not sigh heavily when thinking about reading a Contemporary. Because if I read another Contemporary that I loved as much as this, I shall be very happpy.

five-stars

Stir-Me-Up-by-Sabrina-Elkins

ARC Review: Stir Me Up by Sabrina Elkins

ARC Review: Stir Me Up by Sabrina ElkinsStir Me Up by Sabrina Elkins
Published by Harlequin Teen on December 1st 2013
Genres: Romance, Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 268
Format: eBook
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
five-stars
Cami Broussard has her future all figured out. She'll finish her senior year of high school, then go to work full-time as an apprentice chef in her father's French restaurant, alongside her boyfriend, Luke. But then twenty-year-old ex-Marine Julian Wyatt comes to live with Cami's family while recovering from serious injuries. And suddenly Cami finds herself questioning everything she thought she wanted.

Julian's all attitude, challenges and intense green-brown eyes. But beneath that abrasive exterior is a man who just might be as lost as Cami's starting to feel. And Cami can't stop thinking about him. Talking to him. Wanting to kiss him. He's got her seriously stirred up. Her senior year has just gotten a lot more complicated….

This was such a *sigh* worthy romance. I read it in two sittings and I loved it. Julian, has been given an honourable discharge from the Marines when he was wounded in an IED explosion. He was trying to pull three other people to safety when there was a second explosion, and he was the only one who survived. One of his legs has to amputated, and he sustained many other injuries and obvious emotional scarring. He’s not in a good place and when our main heroine Cami meets him for the first time in his hospital bed, he angrily shouts at her to leave the room. Except, Julian is Cami’s stepmother’s nephew and soon Julian moves out of hospital and into Cami’s room, and consequently, they are forced to see each other every day.

Poor Cami was put out by not having her own private space, but Julian desperately needs the care Cami’s stepmother, Estella, is willing to give. Cami is attending her last year of school and works at her French father’s restaurant–Etoile. She loves cooking mostly French food, and bakes some muffins for Julian in goodwill–he throws it at her head. Commence the angry insults that are thrown at each other. I enjoyed Cami’s love for cooking food, it added to the storyline, and gave her more depth. She was an enjoyable character to read about, because she was so relatable. She goes to school, she has a best friend, she studies, she flirts with a hot Marine…wait, what? Where’s my hot Marine? *Ahem*, anyway, she had a feistiness and friendliness that made me want to be there baking muffins and laughing with her.

Stir Me Up explores the after-math of war in individuals, and the effects of loss. Julian and Cami warm to each other in a slow-burning way, that is believable and sweet. This book is wholly satisfying for Romance-lovers, and prefect for those cold days to snuggle under the covers and get caught up in a highly amusing and adorable romance.

Julian is one sexy marine *swoon*, and Elkins made the connection between him and Cami feel tangible. Cami has no idea what she wants to do other than that she wants to be a chef, and Julian and her share that uncertainty towards their future. I had such a good time reading this, I urge you to read it.

Rating: 5 Stars

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Review: Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo (The Grisha #1)

Review: Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo (The Grisha #1)Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo
Series: The Grisha #1
Published by Indigo, Orion on May 17th 2012
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult
Pages: 320
Format: Paperback
Source: Library
Goodreads
five-stars
The Shadow Fold, a swathe of impenetrable darkness, crawling with monsters that feast on human flesh, is slowly destroying the once-great nation of Ravka.

Alina, a pale, lonely orphan, discovers a unique power that thrusts her into the lavish world of the kingdom’s magical elite—the Grisha. Could she be the key to unravelling the dark fabric of the Shadow Fold and setting Ravka free?

The Darkling, a creature of seductive charm and terrifying power, leader of the Grisha. If Alina is to fulfill her destiny, she must discover how to unlock her gift and face up to her dangerous attraction to him.

But what of Mal, Alina’s childhood best friend? As Alina contemplates her dazzling new future, why can’t she ever quite forget him?

Glorious. Epic. Irresistible. Romance.
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Alina is just a mapmaker, nothing special. Until one day her power is revealed and she discovers that she has the power to bring light and save lives. Alina is not just a mapmaker any more, she is Grisha. Soon, Alina is sleeping in a soft bed and eating delicious meals. Everyday she is training hard physically and mastering her powers to fight The Shadow Fold, because she is everyone’s only hope.

I’ve heard a lot about this series, and I wasn’t sure whether I was ever going to pick it up. I was reading Stephanie from Stepping out of  the Page’s review of this book and she was saying how words like ‘The Shadow Fold’, ‘Ravka’ and ‘Grisha’ intimidate her, and I 100% agree. What with that and the cover, I thought this book was going to be a major Fantasy book–and not one that I’d like. God know’s why, because the only reviews I see of this book are positive.

Shadow and Bone captured my attention like Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas, with similar Fantasy/Historical elements. I’m not sure how I feel about Fantasy, I used to think I didn’t like it but Maas’ and Bardugo’s writing have roped me in and I’m beginning to love the genre.

There are quite a few plot threads, all linking and some that I know are unresolved and are going to hit me in the next book when I least expect it. This world was magical and I adore the premise. Although, I am quite bored of there being a ‘better species’, you know, the one everyone is protecting, with the other species working as slaves. I am so sick to death of that trope. Is there ever a book where both species live in peace or are at least equal? Apparently not.

Still, I liked Alina’s character and I adored her relationship with Mal. They are childhood friends that grew up together, Alina harbours a secret love for Mal ever since they were teenagers. But of course Mal is desirable and not in want of attention from women.

There were many things I could’ve hated about Shadow and Bone, because despite it’s amazing originality, it has a hundred or so cliche’s. For example:

  • Unrequited love for Alina’s childhood best friend
  • An (albeit questionable) love triangle
  • The MC’s life changes over-night
  • Alina is fated to save everyone with her recently discovered power of ‘sunshine’ *snorts* (No really, this was a good plot line, despite how it sounds)

I could go on. But, please don’t let this silly list put you off, because it’s a fantastic book and if you haven’t read it, I dare say it’s a must-read. The Fantasy is really extensive and I loved the world, it was one of the very different elements in the book. It was beautiful and Bardego gave me a clear imagery of every amazing thing in it.

Rating: 5 Stars– I really loved this one, when I least expected it. If you haven’t read it, I urge you to, even if Fantasy is not your thing! You’d be surprised.

five-stars

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Review: Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare (The Infernal Devices #1/3)

Review: Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare (The Infernal Devices #1/3)Clockwork Angel by Cassandra Clare
Series: The Infernal Devices #1
Published by Walker on 3rd March 2011
Genres: Paranormal, Young Adult
Pages: 496
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
Goodreads
four-stars
In a time when Shadowhunters are barely winning the fight against the forces of darkness, one battle will change the course of history forever. Welcome to the Infernal Devices trilogy, a stunning and dangerous prequel to the New York Times bestselling Mortal Instruments series.

The year is 1878. Tessa Gray descends into London’s dark supernatural underworld in search of her missing brother. She soon discovers that her only allies are the demon-slaying Shadowhunters—including Will and Jem, the mysterious boys she is attracted to. Soon they find themselves up against the Pandemonium Club, a secret organization of vampires, demons, warlocks, and humans. Equipped with a magical army of unstoppable clockwork creatures, the Club is out to rule the British Empire, and only Tessa and her allies can stop them....
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  • Cassandra Clare is extremely popular for her other series, The Mortal Instruments, especially with the film coming out in 4 DAYS GUYS. Anyway, The Infernal Devices is set in the same world, but a couple of centuries before, and instead of New York, it’s set in London.

Clockwork Angel was highly enjoyable, the world was extensive, the characters were funny and complex. I’m absolutely delighted I have another two books to also read. Although these books are huge and I’m a slow reader, I manage to fly through all of Cassandra Clare’s novels, and this was no exception.

Tessa begins not knowing a thing about the Shadowhunter world, and so things are discovered new from her perspective. Which was interesting for me, because I’d already experienced it in the modern world with Clary. For those of you who haven’t read The Mortal Instruments (and you really should) you can definitely pick this one up and not get confused. There are certain references that will not be understood, but they will likely go right over your head and you won’t notice them.

“Sometimes, when I have to do something I don’t want to do, I pretend I’m a character from a book. It’s easier to know what they would do.” 

Oh how I hate love triangles, and Clare seems very fond of them, which proves inconvenient. Here we have the choice of either Jem or Will. Jem is the safe, intelligent, kind-hearted and genuinely nice person. Will is witty, mean and a badboy. It’s not hard to imagine who the most popular is (Will), everyone loves a badboy.

Seeing the Shadowhunter world in a different time was fascinating, and immortal characters like Magnus and Camille  were also in Clockwork Angel, as well as City of Bones. I adore Magnus, and although Camille is a not a villain, nor a ally in The Mortal Instruments, I loved her character in this series. Magnus and her have a complexity and past that is so slowly revealed, I’m left desperate for more.

The plot is gripping, and something completely unexpected to me, because we’ve not seen these kind of ‘creature things’ before and I loved the fresh take. It was like the Shadowhunter world equivalent of zombies/robots. I’m so excited to read the next instalment when I have time.

I really enjoy Clare’s sarcastic, witty humour, and the Shadowhunter world, overall I give this a 4 star rating, and I expect it’s going to get eeeven better.

four-stars

ThroneofGlass

Review: Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas

Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas
Series: Throne of Glass #1
Published by Bloomsbury, Bloomsbury Children's on 2nd August 2012
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult
Pages: 432
Format: Paperback
Source: Given From Publisher

Paperback: 432 pages

Publisher: Bloomsbury Childrens (2 Aug 2012)

ISBN-10: 140883233X

Source: Bloomsbury–thank you! This has in no way affected my honest review!

Goodreads

Amazon UK

After serving out a year of hard labor in the salt mines of Endovier for her crimes, 18-year-old assassin Celaena Sardothien is dragged before the Crown Prince. Prince Dorian offers her her freedom on one condition: she must act as his champion in a competition to find a new royal assassin. Her opponents are men-thieves and assassins and warriors from across the empire, each sponsored by a member of the king’s council. If she beats her opponents in a series of eliminations, she’ll serve the kingdom for three years and then be granted her freedom. 

Celaena finds her training sessions with the captain of the guard, Westfall, challenging and exhilirating. But she’s bored stiff by court life. Things get a little more interesting when the prince starts to show interest in her… but it’s the gruff Captain Westfall who seems to understand her best. Then one of the other contestants turns up dead… quickly followed by another. 

Can Celaena figure out who the killer is before she becomes a victim? As the young assassin investigates, her search leads her to discover a greater destiny than she could possibly have imagined.

This entire world is entrancing and amazing. I was gripped all the way through, which doesn’t usually happen, I get slightly bored at some places. Not with Throne of Glass, plot threads linked seamlessly together and complex characters kept me entertained.

I got so invested in all the characters, not just Celeana. Although Celeana was badass and completely my type of heroine. She’s independent, witty, and has a vulnerable side to her past. She’s the type of character who pulled me in instantly and I rooted for all the way through. She was actually really funny, not what I was expecting from a master assassin. Which is fantastic, I like characters who don’t take themselves too seriously and make me laugh.

Chaol is so mysterious, we are kept in the dark a lot about him, so of course that makes me desperate to know more about his character, and I hope he’s explored more in book 2. He’s the kind of character who doesn’t access his feeling easily and I was kind of frustrated with him!

Prince Dorian reads. I don’t know how many times I have to say how much I love a guy that reads. He’s also an expert swordsman, but he prefers to hunker down with a thoughtful book. He constantly had witty back and forth with Celeana which proved entertaining. I found him so charming!

I adore the character development, how Celeana learns to trust, and actually have friends. She sets in wanting to win this competition, but she’s very loyal, despite how determined she is. Chaol also becomes a little more open, though not as much as I’d hoped! Also, Prince Dorian stops being so fickle!

This love triangle is excruciating, because I don’t have a favourite. I thought I did, at parts I’d be sure it was one person and then I realised I love the other as well. This hardly ever happens, I always have a definite favourite! It’s completely thrown me off!

There were a couple of antagonists to keep things interesting, I get bored with the entire focus being on destroying one bad guy. Some of them are undoubtedly going to cause trouble in the next book.

The world itself is captivating, it’s set in a castle, in a historical time period, which I always enjoy. I honestly loved this book sooo much, and completely recommend it to anyone who enjoys strong heroines (who doesn’t?) and amazing worlds!

I am now mourning this world, and desperate to read the next one!

Rating: 5 Stars!

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Release Day Review: All Our Yesterdays by Cristin Terrill (All Our Yesterdays #1)

All Our Yesterdays by Cristin Terrill
Series: All Our Yesterdays #1
Published by Bloomsbury, Bloomsbury Children's on 1st August 2013
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 384
Format: Paperback
Source: Given From Publisher
four-half-stars

 Amazon|Goodreads

  •  
  • “You have to kill him.” Imprisoned in the heart of a secret military base, Em has nothing except the voice of the boy in the cell next door and the list of instructions she finds taped inside the drain.Only Em can complete the final instruction. She’s tried everything to prevent the creation of a time machine that will tear the world apart. She holds the proof: a list she has never seen before, written in her own hand. Each failed attempt in the past has led her to the same terrible present—imprisoned and tortured by a sadistic man called the doctor while war rages outside. Marina has loved her best friend James since the day he moved next door when they were children. A gorgeous, introverted science prodigy from one of America’s most famous families, James finally seems to be seeing Marina in a new way, too. But on one disastrous night, James’s life crumbles apart, and with it, Marina’s hopes for their future. Now someone is trying to kill him. Marina will protect James, no matter what. Even if it means opening her eyes to a truth so terrible that she may not survive it. At least not as the girl she once was. All Our Yesterdays is a wrenching, brilliantly plotted story of fierce love, unthinkable sacrifice, and the infinite implications of our every choice.

After I read this my head was left spinning—as anyone who follows me on Twitter will know. I tweeted about this…a lot. All Our Yesterdays is a time-travel Dystopia, and I wasn’t exactly sure what to expect, but it did not disappoint.

There are mainly two points of view, Em and Marina. Marina is Em’s past self. Em goes back in time to stop the making of Cassandra (the time machine) to a time where Marina is inhabiting. I loved the way they were very different, yet ultimately still the same person. Marina is far more superficial and trying to fit in with her friends, having a teenage love for James. She doesn’t get enough attention from her parents and is trying to be a ‘normal’ teenager.

Em is far more grounded, she has figured out how to love herself, but she’s haunted. She’s been through so much after the making of Cassandra. She’s been tortured and left in a cell. Em doesn’t want Marina to have to go through what she has gone through, and sets out with her partner to stop the making of Cassandra. Em’s love interest is hilarious, he’s the perfect blend of cockiness and sexiness. Such a great addition to my fictional boyfriends! Which there are shamefully many of.

We also got flashbacks from the time when Em was running away from the corruption, and the awful memories of what happened to those she loved. These flashbacks filled in the blanks and made the story a lot more interesting.

I went in All Our Yesterdays without knowing anything at all, I didn’t even read the blurb! Instead of confusing me, it actually made everything more interesting. The plot twists are shocking, delightful, and at times cry-worthy. Seriously, read page 364 and get back to me, because that was the most awful thing in the entire book.

I wanted to see more of the Dystopian world, when most of the book is set in today’s world. It was enforced many times throughout the novel how corrupted the world had become with the making of Cassandra, yet we didn’t see it as much I would have liked. I’m hoping this is going to be in the next instalment.

I definitely recommend this book to Dystopia lovers, or even people starting out with Dystopia! I’m left empty without the next book, which is not out until 2014!

Rating; 4.5 stars

four-half-stars

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Review: The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey (The Fifth Wave #1)

The Fifth Wave by Rick Yancey
Series: The Fifth Wave #1
Published by Penguin on 7th May 2013
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 480
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
four-half-stars

The Passage meets Ender’s Game in an epic new series from award-winning author Rick Yancey.

After the 1st wave, only darkness remains. After the 2nd, only the lucky escape. And after the 3rd, only the unlucky survive. After the 4th wave, only one rule applies: trust no one.

Now, it’s the dawn of the 5th wave, and on a lonely stretch of highway, Cassie runs from Them. The beings who only look human, who roam the countryside killing anyone they see. Who have scattered Earth’s last survivors. To stay alone is to stay alive, Cassie believes, until she meets Evan Walker. Beguiling and mysterious, Evan Walker may be Cassie’s only hope for rescuing her brother—or even saving herself. But Cassie must choose: between trust and despair, between defiance and surrender, between life and death. To give up or to get up.

Goodreads link

 

I don’t even know where to start on this review. The 5th Wave is an absolute gem and if you haven’t picked it up yet, I seriously suggest you go and do so right now.

The Earth sees an alien mothership and we try to contact them, but they don’t answer. Then, after ten days of silence, the first wave begins. The Others send out an electromagnetic pulse which takes out all forms of electricity, power, and kills half a million people. The second wave is a tsunami that kills everyone within sixty miles of a coastline, which is three billion people. The third wave is in the form of a plague which had a 97% mortality rate and took out more than 3.5 billion people.

‘Sometimes I think I might be the last human on earth’

Seventeen-year-old Cassie—for Cassiopeia–is alone in the world, camping in the woods while she tries to stay alive and away from the Others. She has a backpack of essentials including a teddybear, a tent and her gun.

‘The first rule of surviving the 4th Wave is don’t trust anyone’

Cassie is such a kick-ass character, she knows that she has to stay alone to survive and she does. Until she meets Evan Walker. It’s the only person she’s talked to in months and she can’t help but enjoy the human contact. Cassie is brave and fights for her right to stay on Earth which I loved. She was so strong and she’s only sixteen. She does what she has to do to survive and she keeps her promises, it was a delight to read from her perspective, despite the fact that she is written by a man.

Cassie’s not the only POV though, we also have a few others, who I will not name for fear of spoiling you all. I actually enjoyed their POV just as much as Cassie’s, and loved that all of their storylines were relevant and interlocked at various points in the book.

Young Adult Dystopian is a genre that’s increasingly growing, especially after the release of The Hunger Games. I even hesitate to say it’s the ‘Next Big Thing’ in terms of Young Adult and ‘mainstream’ books. It’s not surprising then, that this book is all over the blogosphere with people exclaiming how much they enjoyed it. I enjoyed it too. I’m starting to read more Dystopian’s and The Fifth Wave was something that was incredibly satisfying and different to read. The premise was different, the characters I felt were realistic. They all had their lives before the invasion and Yancey wrote flash-backs which made them more relatable.

I found the plot twists to be captivating, I thought I knew what was going on and then Yancey would flip the story upside-down and change my perspective. He was really good at making me doubt myself and sometimes even deliberately confused for me to make me think certain things about the situations and the characters.

Overall, a really enjoyable Dystopian read. If you’re looking for something to read in the Dystopian genre, I suggest you take a look, because I thought it was fantastic. Then I realised the second one comes out in Summer! Next year.

I’m hoping to see Rick Yancey in London soon, but he hasn’t posted where he’s going to do the signing!

Rating: 4.5 Stars

four-half-stars

Gameboard-of-the-Gods-by-RIchelle-MeadARCwoa

ARC Review: Gameboard of the Gods by Richelle Mead (Age of X #1)

Gameboard of the Gods by Richelle Mead
Series: Age of X #1
Published by Penguin on June 4th 2013
Genres: Sci-Fi, Urban Fantasy
Pages: 464
Format: ARC
Source: NetGalley
five-stars

 Hardcover: 464 pages

Publication date: June 4th 2013

Publisher: Dutton Adult

ISBN: 052595368X (ISBN13: 9780525953685)
Other series written by Richelle Mead: Georgina Kincaid, Dark Swan, Vampire Academy and Bloodlines.
In a futuristic world nearly destroyed by religious extremists, Justin March lives in exile after failing in his job as an investigator of religious groups and supernatural claims. But Justin is given a second chance when Mae Koskinen comes to bring him back to the Republic of United North America (RUNA). Raised in an aristocratic caste, Mae is now a member of the military’s most elite and terrifying tier, a soldier with enhanced reflexes and skills. 

When Justin and Mae are assigned to work together to solve a string of ritualistic murders, they soon realize that their discoveries have exposed them to terrible danger. As their investigation races forward, unknown enemies and powers greater than they can imagine are gathering in the shadows, ready to reclaim the world in which humans are merely game pieces on their board.
Gameboard of the Gods, the first installment of Richelle Mead’s Age of X series, will have all the elements that have made her YA Vampire Academy and Bloodlines series such mega successes: sexy, irresistible characters; romantic and mythological intrigue; and relentless action and suspense.

If you didn’t know, Richelle Mead is one of my favourite authors, so when I got accepted to review this ARC, I did a little dance around my room…YAY! Thank you Penguin Dutton Adult publishing house for giving me this ARC copy. *That has in no way affected my honest review—Richelle just happens to be an awesome writer*

Gameboard of the Gods completely lived up to my expectations, it was simply amazing. The world Mead has built is so extensive and intricate, with every page turn revealing new, exciting aspects. Due to this, the world-building is laid on pretty thick and it wasn’t something I could skim over or half-read, it’s something that was needed to know to understand the overall plot. That is expected in this genre, because it’s the first book, but be warned–there’s a lot of it. Gameboard of the Gods is vastly different to anything Mead has written before, with this delving more into the Sci-Fi and Urban Fantasy realms.

It wasn’t just the world that was captivating, the characters were also.  Justin uses vices like drinking, drugs and woman, and Richelle did a very good job of still making making me actually still like his character. He’s incredibly smart, and is used to being able to watch people and read their body language, which caused Justin and Mae’s working relationship to chafe because of her hard exterior. He also has two ravens making sarcastic comments inside his head, which made for funny entertainment and was incredibly creative.

Mae grew up in fairly wealthy surroundings, she was destined to be married off and give up her own athletic dreams, but contrary to what was expected, she joined the military and became lethal and agile with heightened reflexes and speed. She’s very tough, with impenetrable emotional armour, as she refuses to let anyone get close, which made her character grow throughout the book. She’s certainly a ‘Hardcore Heroine’.

Gameboard of the Gods is in third person, and as well as following Mae and Justin, we also follow Tessa. After having a couple of exciting chapters in Mae and Justin’s point of view, I was worried Tessa would bore me . This was not the case, I got to understand how the RUNA was perceived in a different, intimidating  light in contrast to Justin and Mae’s admiration. Tessa is 16 and from Panama, which has different views on women and their future, and is less technology advanced than the RUNA, so despite that it was a jarring change, she also had more freedom.

There are romantic elements to Gameboard of the Gods, which I thought were nicely added and well-written, I’m anticipating how that’s going to continue in the next book.

Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed it, and highly recommend it!

Rating: 4 Stars

If you’re interested in finding out more about Gameboard of the Gods, Richelle has put on the first two chapters and some character info on her blog, here.

five-stars

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Review: The Indigo Spell by Richelle Mead (Bloodlines #3)

The Indigo Spell by Richelle Mead
Series: Bloodlines #3
Published by Penguin, Razorbill on February 12th 2013
Genres: Paranormal, Young Adult
Pages: 401
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
five-stars

[button link="#http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8709526-the-indigo-spell"] Goodreads The Indigo Spell[/button]

In the aftermath of a forbidden moment that rocked Sydney to her core, she finds herself struggling to draw the line between her Alchemist teachings and what her heart is urging her to do. Then she meets alluring, rebellious Marcus Finch–a former Alchemist who escaped against all odds, and is now on the run. Marcus wants to teach Sydney the secrets he claims the Alchemists are hiding from her. But as he pushes her to rebel against the people who raised her, Sydney finds that breaking free is harder than she thought. There is an old and mysterious magic rooted deeply within her. And as she searches for an evil magic user targeting powerful young witches, she realizes that her only hope is to embrace her magical blood–or else she might be next.

Populated with new faces as well as familiar ones, the Bloodlines series explores all the friendship, romance, battles, and betrayals that made the #1 New York Times bestselling Vampire Academy series so addictive—this time in a part-vampire, part-human setting where the stakes are even higher and everyone’s out for blood.

As I said in The Golden Lily review I posted yesterday, I read these the day they were released but when re-reading them, wanted to share how much I love them.

After The Golden Lily, I was anticipating this release eight months later and boy…what a book it was. The Indigo Spell is filled with romance and sexual tension between Adrian and Sydney, and after what happened at the end of The Golden Lily, things were definitely going to be interesting. And they were. The whole gang at Amberwood- Jill, Eddie, Angeline- don’t get as much attention as they did in the previous books, although there are issues and storylines concerning them, the main focus is on Sydney, her Alchemist business and the romance between her and Adrian.

Sydney is an Alchemist, helping Moroi (Vampires) to cover up their existence to other humans because Alchemists believe they are evil monsters. She’s working at Amberwood  boarding school in Palm Springs to protect Moroi Jill and keep her in hiding. She previously feared the Moroi, but she’s finding herself growing away from those beliefs more than she ever thought was possible. Before, she’d freak out when a Moroi even tried doing magic, but as we saw in The Golden Lily, she actively joining in with magic. The Indigo Spell reinforces how harsh and controlling Alchemists are; they hate Moroi and think they’re unnatural, they’ll do whatever they can to stop themselves from working directly with them, lest they get tainted by the evil. Sydney was brought up with these beliefs, so of course they’re a little hard to shake. But the Alchemists are a web of lies, half of them keeping top-secret information from the other half of the organisation. Sydney soon realises, she’s not even sure what she believes anymore.

Things are sizzling between Sydney and Adrian sexual tension wise, but with Sydney refusing to go against her Alchemist beliefs, Adrian promises not to bring up his love confessions. Poor Adrian, he always seems to fall in love with complicated people. As much as Sydney refuses to acknowledge her feelings for Adrian, she still trusts him, and throughout The Indigo Spell, their relationship grows stronger. The romance is bumped up a notch compared to The Golden Lily, so watch out. Cute things, funny things, swoon worthy things, it’s all there! Adrian is as witty as ever, but even with his incessant jokes, he shows a lot of sweet emotion towards Sydney.

The Indigo Spell is also filled with funny elements, kooky characters and hilarious naming. Malachi Wolfe, which seems to be one of Richelle Mead’s favourite minor characters makes an appearance, sharing those far-fetched stories he loves to tell. I think he’s a hilarious character- he also has a Twitter account, follow @MalachiWolfe. Characters like Malachi are typical of Richelle’s writing style, which you might have guessed, I’m a fan of.

I’ve heard many people dissatisfied with Marcus Finch, a character Mead hyped up, but then confessed she changed things slightly for him– apparently he was meant to be another love interest for Sydney. I wasn’t particularly impressed by his character either, and he didn’t live up to expectations. He was completely different to how I thought he would be and I would have liked more to his character, however, I still really enjoyed The Indigo Spell.

Rating: 5 Stars

So, now another nine months to wait, as it’s been said The Fiery Heart ( Bloodlines four) will be released on November 19th.

I’m not sure I can take it.

five-stars

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Review: The Fault In Our Stars by John Green

The Fault in our Stars by John Green
Published by Penguin on January 12 2012
Genres: Contemporary, Contemporary Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 368
Format: eBook
Source: Bought
five-stars

The Fault in Our Stars The Fault in Our StarsJohn Green; Dutton Juvenile 2012WorldCatLibraryThingGoogle BooksBookFinder

Hardcover: 368 pages

Published: January 12th 2012

Diagnosed with Stage IV thyroid cancer at 13, Hazel was prepared to die until, at 14, a medical miracle shrunk the tumours in her lungs… for now. 

Two years post-miracle, sixteen-year-old Hazel is post-everything else, too; post-high school, post-friends and post-normalcy. And even though she could live for a long time (whatever that means), Hazel lives tethered to an oxygen tank, the tumours tenuously kept at bay with a constant chemical assault. 

Enter Augustus Waters. A match made at cancer kid support group, Augustus is gorgeous, in remission, and shockingly to her, interested in Hazel. Being with Augustus is both an unexpected destination and a long-needed journey, pushing Hazel to re-examine how sickness and health, life and death, will define her and the legacy that everyone leaves behind.

 

Hazel Grace was diagnosed with stage four thyroid cancer at the age of thirteen—there is no stage five. She immediately quit school and prepared for the worst, but with the help of a miracle drug, she’s been kept alive living with the unpredictable nature of cancer. At her cancer support group she meets Augustus, who is in remission, with the cancer already having taken one of his legs.

This book is incredibly emotional to read. I, like most people, have been deeply affected by cancer and found The Fault In Our Stars to be accurate and undeniably true. It’s not the typical cancer book—which I usually avoid like the plague—it’s witty, funny and gut-wrenching.

All of Green’s books are YA and he’s said in various interviews that writing adult fiction does not appeal to him at all, and he doesn’t ever want to write it. He worked as a student chaplain in a children’s hospital and that’s when he though of the idea for The Fault In Our Stars. This is probably why his characters are so bright and their situation thought-provoking, because John has met people in similar situations and didn’t under-estimate the teenager characters. For a man in his 40’s, he writes ‘teenager’s’ POV very well, as they’re not actually completely ‘normal’ teenagers, they’ve had to face a lot worse than most people face in a lifetime. Therefore, when people say the teenagers are not realistic enough, or are too insightful—of course Hazel and Augustus are not ‘normal’ teenagers, they undoubtedly have a different perspective on certain aspects in life.

I was completely out of my comfort zone by picking this book up, because when I read YA, it’s usually paranormal and I’m very selective about that. However, once I started reading it was very hard to stop, I’m a slow reader, and I read this in two sit-downs. I do not think it’s over-rated in the slightest, John Green’s writing is funny and astute. It expresses tragedy and humour at the same time without being disrespectful. John Green captivated me and made me contemplate certain matters and empathise with every single character.

Hazel was intelligent and fairly ordinary, which was what made her a realistic and likeable character, because it symbolises the fickle nature of life and the fact that cancer can affect anyone. Like most readers, she had a favourite book–An Imperial Affliction and this later became a large aspect in the book that helped her relationship with Augustus grow. Their relationship was authentic and nicely paced throughout, building on a series of events that made them become closer and understand themselves better, whilst at the same time trying to understand their views on life better.

This book made me cry and laugh-out-loud, it was a truly enjoyable read and I hope to devour more of John Green’s books in the future.

Rating: 5 Stars

five-stars

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Review: Obsidian by Jennifer L. Armentrout (Lux #1)

File Size: 399 KB

Print Length: 294 pages

Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1937044238

Publisher: Entangled Teen (May 8, 2012)

ASIN: B00850ZM28

 

When we moved to West Virginia right before my senior year, I’d pretty much resigned myself to thick accents, dodgy internet access, and a whole lot of boring…. until I spotted my hot neighbor, with his looming height and eerie green eyes. Things were looking up.

And then he opened his mouth.

Daemon is infuriating. Arrogant. Stab-worthy. We do not get along. At all. But when a stranger attacks me and Daemon literally freezes time with a wave of his hand, well, something…unexpected happens.
The hot alien living 
next door marks me.
You heard me. Alien. Turns out Daemon and his sister have a galaxy of enemies wanting to steal their abilities, and Daemon’s touch has me lit up like the 
Vega
s Strip. The only way I’m getting out of this alive is by sticking close to Daemon until my alien mojo fades.


I devoured this book. With an interesting premise about light aliens, it’s certainly different from what I’ve read from any paranormal Young Adult before, especially when it comes to love-at-first-sight. Yawn. This was not the case in Obsidian; when Daemon and Katy met, there were undeniable sparks between them, but their eyes were throwing daggers, not dopey looks of love. As a major fan of witty, sarcastic characters, this book delivered on all levels for me. Daemon and Katy have an interesting relationship, one moment they were about to kiss and the next they were about to strangle each other. Katy could stand up for herself and was gutsy, which was a surprise for Daemon, as his super-model looks usually kept dry insults at bay. Katy began to seem fairly shy, and even though I’m not against shy, I do like my fair share of defiant heroines, but I think Daemon brought out the confidence in her simply because he acted like a douche. I enjoyed following Katy’s character, she had a lot I could relate to and a realistic teenage voice, also, she’s a book blogger, why has no one done this before? There were references to certain books in there, and Katy shared my love for comics, graphic novels and paranormal books.


Beautiful face. Beautiful body. Horrible attitude. It was the holy trinity of hot boys.”


With the typical hot but a jerk male character, there is always a fine line between thinking they’re attractive and generally just disliking them. Just as I was beginning to slide into disliking Daemon, Jennifer made me love him and from then on Armentrout had captured my attention. Daemon was very interesting and mysterious and with bonus material showing his points of view at the end of the book, I got to see what he was thinking in various chapters. And boy did I want to know what he was thinking! He is a male bad boy character I really enjoyed and I haven’t read his type so well written in a while. He was hot and witty, although, he was the typical everyone-is-stunned-by-his-beauty type of guy, but I guess that is not uncommon.

Nothing in this book seemed rushed, it was all so nicely paced! I have problems with pace because I’m really picky. I don’t like things going so slow they’re boring, but I also don’t like things –especially romance- moving too fast that it’s unbelievable. Jennifer knew when to pull me in and raise the tension throughout the whole book, and I was entranced.


“Will you show me what you really look like? You don’t sparkle, do you?”


Aliens are a great idea and go into sci-fi realms slightly so I wasn’t really sure what I was going to get here. But it didn’t seem to far-fetched and I found myself enjoying something that was completely fresh and it felt like Jennifer was throwing cool new ideas at me. Really enjoyed that part and hope she’s going to bring her game up in the next book.


I give this an 4.5 Stars Really, really liked this book, certainly recommended if you like bad boys!

The Great Gatsby

I’ve recently read The Great Gatsby because a friend recommended it, and I really liked it! I know the film is coming out in 2013, and as it’s an old classic, I’m interested to see people’s reactions to it. The film is an adaptation of F.Scott Fitzgerald and was supposed to be releasing this December. Due to money problems, it’s now releasing in May 2013.
Leonardo DiCaprio is playing Jay Gatsby, but I haven’t seen him wearing the pink suit mentioned in the book!
He looks just as dashing, although I’m not sure the gelled hair is his style…
Carey Mulligan is playing Daisy Buchanan, below, and the dress looks beautiful. 

Above is the trailer, enjoy!


Desperately Desiring…

Magic Bites: Special Edition



 New York Times bestselling author Ilona Andrews invites you to experience the first novel in the “intriguing world” (Locus) of Kate Daniels with this special edition ofMagic Bites
Kate Daniels is a down-on-her-luck mercenary who makes her living cleaning up magical problems. But when Kate’s guardian is murdered, her quest for justice draws her into a power struggle between two strong factions within Atlanta’s magic circles. Pressured by both sides to find the killer, Kate realizes she’s way out of her league—but she wouldn’t want it any other way…
This special edition includes in-depth information about the world of Kate Daniels, with descriptions of its characters and factions. Explore Kate’s Atlanta like never before with answers to FAQ and a quiz to find your place there. And don’t miss the prequel story “A Questionable Client,” as well as scenes of events in Magic Bites from Curran’s point of view.
This book was released a while ago, because Ilona Andrews has done 5 books so far, in the Kate Daniel series and Magic Bites is the first. Except this is a special edition and has Curran’s point of view. Curran’s point to of view? I’m sold. I’ve never read ‘A Questionable Client’ either, and knowing the Ilona Andrews duo, it’ll be hilarious. If you haven’t read it, it’s a must-read! Such an amazing series and so entertaining, Magic Bites will be released on the 31st December.