Category Archives: 4.5 Stars

Review: Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson

Review: Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan MatsonSince You've Been Gone by Morgan Matson
Published by Simon and Schuster Children's on May 6th 2014
Genres: Contemporary, Contemporary Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 449 (hardback)
Format: Paperback
Source: Given From Publisher
four-half-stars
The Pre-Sloane Emily didn't go to parties, she barely talked to guys, she didn't do anything crazy. Enter Sloane, social tornado and the best kind of best friend—the one who yanks you out of your shell. But right before what should have been an epic summer, Sloane just… disappears. No note. No calls. No texts. No Sloane. There’s just a random to-do list. On it, thirteen Sloane-selected-definitely-bizarre-tasks that Emily would never try… unless they could lead back to her best friend.Apple Picking at Night? Okay, easy enough. Dance until Dawn? Sure. Why not? Kiss a Stranger? Wait… what? Getting through Sloane’s list would mean a lot of firsts. But Emily has this whole unexpected summer ahead of her, and the help of Frank Porter (totally unexpected) to check things off. Who knows what she’ll find? Go Skinny Dipping? Um…

*I was given this book for review by Simon and Schuster. This in no way affected my review.*

So this review is far later than I planned :( . One for school and stress and part-time jobs. But also because I thought I’d posted it months ago! Sucks for me. Without further ado, here is my review that should hopefully make you want to read SYBG

SINCE YOU’VE BEEN GOOONE. I CANNOT BREATHE FOR THE FIRST TIIIME.

Since You’ve Been Gone is one of my favourite Summer books and was such a brilliant read. Emily is your average girl who hides behind her best friend Sloane. Yes, the premise is a bit cheesy (aren’t the MCs always boring and average?) but it’s relatable. Sloane abruptly leaves, and Emily is left friend-less all Summer. In the post she recieves a letter from Sloane with a list of things she must do. The list includes things like ‘dance at midnight’ and ‘hug a jamie’, I thought this list brought a fun element to the story and integrated nicely with the romance and ‘finding oneself’ plot.

This writing is along the lines of Gayle Forman’s, in which the romance isn’t the driving point of the novel, but rather Emily finding who she is without hiding behind an enigmatic best friend. I really liked Emily, and I surprisingly liked Sloane. Usually in these type of books where the friend leaves, the MC becomes insufferable and whiny. I know they’re missing their friends, I know. But I’m not reading this book to slog through pages of whining about their loneliness. Sorry.

Emily handles the situation really well–at first she’s a bit thrown–but for someone who’s not massively confident, she isn’t annoying and wimpy. SYBG handles friendships, love, relationships, etc etc–all the stuff I love, if I’m being honest. I adored how the main point of the book was for Emily to bring herself out of her comfort zone and do things she normally wouldn’t do. Summer books are so great because they always feel like they have so many possibilities. Anything could happen. This feeling of endless outcomes and situations is my favourite thing to read.

Emily’s character develops and grows really convincingly as she puts herself in situations she wouldn’t normally put herself in. The minor characters were also really enjoyable, and I learnt to really like them. Frank wasn’t my type of guy, but I warmed to him more than I thought, and himself and Emily were a perfect match. I got really excited for all the chapters and things on the list to get checked off.

SPOILER ALERT SPOILER ALERT : What I didn’t like was how easily Emily’s new ‘friends’ wrote her off. One quick mistake towards the end and these friendships kind of fell apart, what’s that about? Suddenly I didn’t like her new friends nearly as much. Nah. END OF SPOILERS END OF SPOILERS.

This book was an awesome Summer read, and I think it’s a must-read for those who love their Summer books. Despite it now moving into Autumn and cold weather, this Summer book might be necessary to warm you while you’re stuck in the cold.

Rating: 4.5 Stars– Morgan Matson I am following your new releases like a my dog follows food.

four-half-stars

Review: Skin Deep by Laura Jarratt

Review: Skin Deep by Laura JarrattSkin Deep by Laura Jarratt
Published by Electric Monkey on March 5th 2012
Genres: Contemporary, Contemporary Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 377
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
four-half-stars
Ugly people don't have feelings. They're not like everyone else. They don't notice if you stare at them and turn away. And if they did notice, it wouldn't hurt them. They're not like real people. Or that's what I used to think. Before I learned...After the car crash that leaves her best friend dead, Jenna is permanently scarred. She struggles to rebuild her life, but every stare in the street, every time she looks in the mirror, makes her want to retreat further from the world. Until she meets Ryan. Ryan's a traveller. When he and his mother moor their narrow boat on the outskirts of a village, she tells him this time it will be different. He doesn't believe her; he can't imagine why this place shouldn't be as unwelcoming as the rest. Until he meets Jenna. But as Jenna and Ryan grow closer, repercussions from the crash continue to reverberate through the community. And then a body is found...

Skin Deep is about a girl who is in a car crash and suffers severe burns, causing a large, disfiguring scar to mar along one side of her face. This accident has happened less than a year ago and the wounds are still fresh (literally and figuratively). Jenna doesn’t often go out anymore, for fear of the pointing and whispering from other people. Naturally, as a 14-year-old, she’s already got some insecurities about her appearance, but after this accident,  Jenna has understandably become more reserved and has only one friend.

Skin Deep was an incredibly emotion-inducing read. It was a brilliant blend of romance and contemporary that I love. Ryan is a traveller, who’s mum has Bi-Polar disorder and never wants to stay in one place. This time though, Ryan puts his foot down, and is set upon staying in this town for longer than usual–perhaps permanently. I loved the way the scars were handled, and how Ryan treated Jenna with the scars. At first, Jenna is incredibly sensitive and takes offence at many words that were not meant to be hurtful. Soon though, she begins to crack out of her shell and do things normal teenagers should do without a second thought.

Ryan is goshdang special, there is simply no other word for it. I have read many Romances and I have a lot of book boyfriends and Ryan is so incredibly different and so the same. As Ryan and Jenna fall in love, I was so happy for them and loved the way it was written. Ryan had this way of making Jenna feel beautiful even with her scars, which was a hard feat. He helped build her confidence and I’m sure, without him it would have taken many more years to gain such confidence. I thought they were genuinely perfect for each other. Together, they had their own issues, and it was very balanced the way they both leant on each other, and helped each other when they needed to.

The only thing that annoyed me about this book was Jenna’s father. In the accident, Jenna was with her best friend friends, who were smoking and taking drugs whilst driving. No, Jenna did not have the imitative to make them stop and let her out, and this caused the crash. However, I’m pretty sure she learned her lesson by the months it took her scar to heal–and is still healing. Also, with the emotional trauma of her best friends dying, and another girl dying. This doesn’t stop her father from stunting her emotional growth when she’s trying to re-build herself though. He constantly questions what she is doing, and shouting at her for trying to go out with friend. I get that there’s a trust issue after that crash and Jenna was close to dying, but that’s his problem–not hers. Her father is just so incredibly angry all the time, and sets up a local campaign in their small town to take a stand against speeding. But he doesn’t listen to her. Jenna hates this campaign, she feels uncomfortable being looked at, and no one treats her like a normal girl. Her father continually calls her selfish. It looks to me like the father needs therapy and not her. Perhaps it’s just my family, but if I was this uncomfortable and hurt by this campaign, my family would stop immediately. Okay. Rant over. Word of warning, this never really gets resolved, but I still loved the book.

Jarratt has crafted such an emotional and amazing book about first love, trauma, insecurities and re-building oneself. I loved it. It was exactly my kind of Contemporary and definitely a re-read. I read it in about two days, because it’s the kind of book you make time for.

Rating: 4.5 Stars

four-half-stars

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Review: Origin by Jennifer L. Armentrout (Lux #4)

Review: Origin by Jennifer L. Armentrout (Lux #4)Origin by Jennifer L. Armentrout
Series: Lux #4
Published by Entangled Teen on August 27th 2013
Genres: Paranormal, Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 374
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
four-half-stars
Daemon will do anything to get Katy back.

After the successful but disastrous raid on Mount Weather, he’s facing the impossible. Katy is gone. Taken. Everything becomes about finding her. Taking out anyone who stands in his way? Done. Burning down the whole world to save her? Gladly. Exposing his alien race to the world? With pleasure.

All Katy can do is survive.

Surrounded by enemies, the only way she can come out of this is to adapt. After all, there are sides of Daedalus that don’t seem entirely crazy, but the group’s goals are frightening and the truths they speak even more disturbing. Who are the real bad guys? Daedalus? Mankind? Or the Luxen?

Together, they can face anything.

But the most dangerous foe has been there all along, and when the truths are exposed and the lies come crumbling down, which side will Daemon and Katy be standing on?

And will they even be together?

Well, well, well, this series has certainly picked up the pace. As much as I love the Lux series, I always treat it as a bit of a fun and flirty read with some hot aliens. Even after numerous cliff-hangers, where I’m desperate to read the next book, I still felt this way. I could see the cliff-hanger in Opal coming a mile away and while I was impressed, I wasn’t at all surprised. However Origin felt like a completely different book to me, whereas the other books I’ve not written a review for because I feel they merge together slightly.

I have to admit, I liked the arguments in Obsidian between Katy and Daemon, with the witty back and forth but the undeniable attraction. When Katy and Daemon finally got together as a couple, I was happy, but thought some of the romance felt a bit boring at times. I don’t know if it was the complete change of setting or something else, but the romance felt alive and the chemistry was there once again. The setting change was really interesting, because we’ve been in this small town for all three books now, and it felt really good to see what the actual alien world is like, and how our main protagonist would deal with this world. As soon as I was relaxing into the story, Armentrout brought something completely new to the table and captivated me further. This new plot twist is exciting and could literally go anywhere. It kept me on my toes and makes me so excited to see how this is going to end!

Despite the ending of Opal indicating otherwise, we see our most loved characters and their interactions. I was a little worried we wouldn’t see the usual gang that we’ve come to love, what with the new setting, however this was not the case. Armentrout carefully crafted new settings and new characters, but kept our old and most loved characters in for some familiarity.

Of course, there is a huge cliff-hanger, because Armentrout seems to love this plot device. Everything is going to plan and then shit stuff goes down. Seriously, it’s a pretty huge cliff-hanger and one I loved, because it was certainly not something I was expecting.

Rating 4.5 Stars–I really recommend this series as always, but especially this one. Armentrout has really surprised me in such an amazing way and I’m in love with this series more than ever. Once again, I was taken on a whirlwind of intrigue, humour and also morbid realisation about the aliens and the world Armentrout has created. I cannot wait for the next instalment where everyone will finally get some closure!

four-half-stars

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Review: Twice Tempted by Jeaniene Frost (Night Prince #2)

Review: Twice Tempted by Jeaniene Frost (Night Prince #2)Twice Tempted by Jeaniene Frost
Series: Night Prince #2
Published by Avon on 26th March 2013
Genres: Paranormal Romance
Pages: 326
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
Goodreads
four-half-stars
Leila's psychic abilities have been failing her, and now she isn't sure what the future holds. If that weren't enough, her lover, Vlad, has been acting distant. Though Leila is a mere mortal, she's also a modern woman who refuses to accept the cold shoulder treatment forever–especially from the darkly handsome vampire who still won't admit that he loves her.

Like choosing between eternal love and a loveless eternity...

Soon circumstances send Leila back to the carnival circuit, where tragedy strikes. And when she finds herself in the crosshairs of a killer who may be closer than she realizes, Leila must decide who to trust– the fiery vampire who arouses her passions like no other or the tortured knight who longs to be more than a friend? With danger stalking her every step of the way, all it takes is one wrong move to damn her for eternity.
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YAY! Love this series! I was a little apprehensive about reading a spin-off with Vlad, and although I really enjoyed Once Burned, Twice Tempted was that much more enjoyable for me.

I love character development and Frost writes it incredibly well. Both Leila and Vlad grew as a couple and did what they needed to make the relationship work. Like adults. Which is why I adore their relationship so much. Vlad isn’t used to having someone so close to him, and although he has had lovers, he’s not been in an equal partnership in a long time. Not just because Vlad is a commitment-phobe either. Rather, because the one woman he did love killed herself, because she was so afraid of him. You can see why Vlad is a little reluctant to fall in love after that, so he simply refuses. I love Vlad’s character so much more now, before he was mysterious (and he still is), but his character has been given much more depth and reason for his actions. I really fell in love with him in this one.

That’s not to say Vlad wasn’t infuriating at times, because he seriously is. However, it worked because Vlad never changed who he was completely. He’s still brutal Vlad, and although he bends much more than he has before, for Leila. He doesn’t change. I find in some relationships in these books, the ruthless Vampire falls in love with the woman and becomes a bit soppy. Which I find unrealistic, because it’s almost like their entire character changes.

Leila also has character development, and together, you have two evolving characters that don’t annoy you. Leila is hilarious at times, her sarcastic inner-commentary and witty remarks are exactly what I look for in a character. She’s someone people underestimate, with an awesome power of electricity and ability to read emotional imprints on people. Frost has given her truly compelling and intriguing powers. Leila is the kind of character you

I really adore this world, the characters and the world-building. There is a fair bit of romance, but it doesn’t dominate the book, and it was just the right amount for me. I’m very sad that there’s only going to be one more book, however, at least this series will end strongly and is unlikely to fizz out. Twice Tempted is not a book to miss, and is the kind of book where two hours will go by and the pages are flipping themselves, because you are so into the story and characters. Frost has done an excellent job with this world and I highly recommend it if you enjoy Paranormal Romance, because, trust me, it’s the good stuff.

four-half-stars

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Review: Legend by Marie Lu (Legend #1)

Review: Legend by Marie Lu (Legend #1)Legend by Marie Lu
Series: Legend
Published by Penguin on November 29th 2011
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 304
Format: Paperback
Source: Library
Goodreads
four-half-stars
What was once the western United States is now home to the Republic, a nation perpetually at war with its neighbors. Born into an elite family in one of the Republic’s wealthiest districts, fifteen-year-old June is a prodigy being groomed for success in the Republic’s highest military circles. Born into the slums, fifteen-year-old Day is the country’s most wanted criminal. But his motives may not be as malicious as they seem.

From very different worlds, June and Day have no reason to cross paths—until the day June’s brother, Metias, is murdered and Day becomes the prime suspect. Caught in the ultimate game of cat and mouse, Day is in a race for his family’s survival, while June seeks to avenge Metias’s death. But in a shocking turn of events, the two uncover the truth of what has really brought them together, and the sinister lengths their country will go to keep its secrets.
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Oh look, another Dystopian book that I loved. Legend was really fantastic!

I loved June and Day, there were a fantastic combination. June was very determined once her brother died and that was something that I admired. I completely related to the relationship with her brother, and actually wished we’d seen more of their relationship but he dies quite early on.  June is the only one to have ever gotten a perfect score of 1500 on her test, which ensures what direction her life will take. She’s practically a genius, and also rather arrogant at the start, but she learns more about herself as the novel goes on, which makes her re-evaluate her opinions on certain things and changes her. Throughout Legend, she makes perceptive observations and can detect things the average person can’t, that let us piece together different aspects about a person’s character. She was very capable, and soon realised how corrupt the Republic was, because she had to work directly with them. I always find it hard in these novels to believe that everyone, including all soldiers, are evil. However, Thomas had exactly the same awful beliefs as everyone else and I really wanted him to be different–but he wasn’t and I now hate his character. At some points, Legend has a detective novel likeness to it, with Metias’ death she’s left with a lot of questions, and this is where her genius nature comes into play.

Legend is told in two perspectives–June and Day’s, and I loved reading both of those views. In other books, I sometimes get bored of one person or their situation, and scan that chapter, but I was always captivated no matter the point of view. It was incredibly interesting and funny to see each character from each others point of view.

Day is so funny, and incredibly brave protecting his family, we get a couple of flashbacks with him which made his character more complete and I liked the insight into his past. I’m interested to know more about his past and June’s, because there are a few loose ends, especially involving June’s parents.

I loved the ending, and I’m really excited about where this series is going. The third and final book is releasing in November, so I need to read Prodigy before then!

This book has action, romance, corruption, death and I loved every second of it. It’s highly recommended if you’re in love with Dystopia’s at the moment.

Rating: 4.5 Stars

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Release Day Review: All Our Yesterdays by Cristin Terrill (All Our Yesterdays #1)

All Our Yesterdays by Cristin Terrill
Series: All Our Yesterdays #1
Published by Bloomsbury, Bloomsbury Children's on 1st August 2013
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 384
Format: Paperback
Source: Given From Publisher
four-half-stars

 Amazon|Goodreads

  •  
  • “You have to kill him.” Imprisoned in the heart of a secret military base, Em has nothing except the voice of the boy in the cell next door and the list of instructions she finds taped inside the drain.Only Em can complete the final instruction. She’s tried everything to prevent the creation of a time machine that will tear the world apart. She holds the proof: a list she has never seen before, written in her own hand. Each failed attempt in the past has led her to the same terrible present—imprisoned and tortured by a sadistic man called the doctor while war rages outside. Marina has loved her best friend James since the day he moved next door when they were children. A gorgeous, introverted science prodigy from one of America’s most famous families, James finally seems to be seeing Marina in a new way, too. But on one disastrous night, James’s life crumbles apart, and with it, Marina’s hopes for their future. Now someone is trying to kill him. Marina will protect James, no matter what. Even if it means opening her eyes to a truth so terrible that she may not survive it. At least not as the girl she once was. All Our Yesterdays is a wrenching, brilliantly plotted story of fierce love, unthinkable sacrifice, and the infinite implications of our every choice.

After I read this my head was left spinning—as anyone who follows me on Twitter will know. I tweeted about this…a lot. All Our Yesterdays is a time-travel Dystopia, and I wasn’t exactly sure what to expect, but it did not disappoint.

There are mainly two points of view, Em and Marina. Marina is Em’s past self. Em goes back in time to stop the making of Cassandra (the time machine) to a time where Marina is inhabiting. I loved the way they were very different, yet ultimately still the same person. Marina is far more superficial and trying to fit in with her friends, having a teenage love for James. She doesn’t get enough attention from her parents and is trying to be a ‘normal’ teenager.

Em is far more grounded, she has figured out how to love herself, but she’s haunted. She’s been through so much after the making of Cassandra. She’s been tortured and left in a cell. Em doesn’t want Marina to have to go through what she has gone through, and sets out with her partner to stop the making of Cassandra. Em’s love interest is hilarious, he’s the perfect blend of cockiness and sexiness. Such a great addition to my fictional boyfriends! Which there are shamefully many of.

We also got flashbacks from the time when Em was running away from the corruption, and the awful memories of what happened to those she loved. These flashbacks filled in the blanks and made the story a lot more interesting.

I went in All Our Yesterdays without knowing anything at all, I didn’t even read the blurb! Instead of confusing me, it actually made everything more interesting. The plot twists are shocking, delightful, and at times cry-worthy. Seriously, read page 364 and get back to me, because that was the most awful thing in the entire book.

I wanted to see more of the Dystopian world, when most of the book is set in today’s world. It was enforced many times throughout the novel how corrupted the world had become with the making of Cassandra, yet we didn’t see it as much I would have liked. I’m hoping this is going to be in the next instalment.

I definitely recommend this book to Dystopia lovers, or even people starting out with Dystopia! I’m left empty without the next book, which is not out until 2014!

Rating; 4.5 stars

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Review: Dare You To by Katie McGarry (Pushing The Limits #2)

Dare You To by Katie McGarry
Series: Pushing The Limits #1
Published by Mira Ink on 22nd May 2013
Genres: Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 470
Format: eBook
Source: NetGalley
four-half-stars

Dare You To was such an enjoyable read! It had it all: internal conflict and external conflict, with really well done character development considering it’s only over one book. It’s written in both Ryan’s and Beth’s POV, which made it easier to empathise with Ryan and see the story from a bigger perspective.

Beth has issues. Not that that’s surprising considering her home situation. She has trouble with trust,  abandonment, love, relationships in general, and the list goes on. Ryan’s life looks perfect to Beth, but as she looks closer she can see the cracks.

There are so many plot lines going on that keeps this book well-paced, yet not too taxing to read. It’s a fantastic, well written story with brilliantly complex and tortured characters. Beth was on the precipice of annoying me because of her trust issues, but if she’d trusted Ryan any quicker, it would be unrealistic. It’s not a light-hearted, fluffy book, it gets really quite gritty considering it’s a YA romance and contemporary.

Dare You To has got the malicious ex-girlfriend, muscley jocks, humour, and every kind of relationship strains. So many messed up relationships: Beth and her Uncle, Beth and her mother, Beth and her best friend, Beth and Ryan. Ryan and his brother, Ryan and his mother and father. All of these relationships were tested and brought to the fore-front at least once in Dare You To, really exploring their dynamics. I probably liked it so much because of of the complex characters and relationships—which I’m a sucker for.

I didn’t particularly like Beth or relate to her much, but I appreciated her character. That rarely happens to me, if I can’t relate to the character, I’ll probably stop reading. If  can’t find an emotional connection, I simply won’t bother. I empathised for Beth, and enjoyed her character, but I’m not sure I would want to be her best friend or anything. She was very tough and goth-girl, she had to put on this persona because of her terrible upbringing. I liked Ryan a lot more, because he was more simple, yet still had deep problems. I could relate to him more for some reason.

I could go on more about this book because there is so much that goes on and so much to discuss, but I won’t!

Rating: 4.5 Stars I would like to give this an A, but I don’t feel like it’s affected me enough, or been one of the best books I’ve ever read. Otherwise, hiiighly enjoyable and tense read. With shockingly true events and oh-so complex characters. Can’t wait to read the next in the series!

four-half-stars

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Review: Delirium by Lauren Oliver (Delirium #1)

Delirium by Lauren Oliver
Series: Delirium #1
Published by Hodder and Stoughton on 4th August 2011
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 416
Format: Hardcover
Source: Library
four-half-stars

 

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder Paperbacks (4 Aug 2011)
  • ISBN-10: 0340980931

They say that the cure for love will make me happy and safe forever. And I’ve always believed them. 

Until now. 

Now everything has changed. Now, I’d rather be infected with love for the tiniest sliver of a second than live a hundred years suffocated by a lie.

There was a time when love was the most important thing in the world. People would go to the end of the earth to find it. They would tell lies for it. Even kill for it. 

Then, at last, they found the cure.

 

“Symptoms of Amor Deliria Nervosa
PHASE ONE:
-preoccupation; difficulty focusing
-dry mouth
-perspiration, sweaty palms
-fits of dizziness and disorientation
-reduced mental awareness; racing thoughts; impaired reasoning skills”

Lena lives in a world where love is forbidden and considered a disease. No one is allowed to love anyone or anything–not even their children–and at the age of 18 everyone has a brain surgery that gets rid of their ability to love. Lena is counting down the days until she has the procedure, to make her like everyone else. After she has the surgery, she will be paired with someone who is scientifically compatible with her, and they will have as many children as they’re financially able.

Her mother was illegally uncured, and so different from everyone else. Having the procedure is a huge step in proving Lena’s nothing like her mother and that she’s normal. Lena’s mum didn’t do ordinary ‘mum stuff’, she used to play with Lena and her sister, kiss their bruises when they tripped over. And then she killed herself, after the third time the government tried to cure her unsuccessfully. Now Lena is living with her aunt who has tried her best to steer her away from the taint on their family caused by her mother. Except, after spending so long counting down the days until the procedure, Lena is beginning to have doubts. She doesn’t know who she can trust, and can’t decide if what she has been believing all her life is a lie.

“PHASE TWO:
-periods of euphoria; hysterical laughter and heightened energy
-periods of despair; lethargy
-changes in appetite; rapid weight loss or weight gain
-fixation; loss of other interests
-compromised reasoning skills; distortion of reality
-disruption of sleep patterns; insomnia or constant fatigue
-obsessive thoughts and actions
-paranoia; insecurity”

This book is so good, and it really fed my love for Dystopia at the moment. Lena was confused about love–something that was always a rather simple concept in today’s society. Instead of being celebrated, love is feared, and eradicated. Lena notices that everyone who gets cured is not the same afterwards, doesn’t act the same and are rather unseeing and bland. But she doesn’t want to turn out like her mother, she wants to be normal.

I’m a little curious as to how they are doing brain surgery and practically changing people’s personality, or putting a damper on it. I’m not sure if this is going to be addressed in the next book or not, but I’m quite curious, considering the brain is quite fragile and you can’t just take random bits out.

“PHASE THREE (CRITICAL):
-difficulty breathing
-pain in the chest, throat or stomach
-complete breakdown of rational faculties; erratic behavior; violent thoughts and fantasies; hallucinations and delusions
PHASE FOUR (FATAL):
-emotional or physical paralysis (partial or total)
-death”

I really enjoyed Delirium, and I’m disappointed that they are cancelled the TV series they were going to do, as I’d really like to see this and how they would portray the world. Lena was trying to be strong and support her beliefs, except she didn’t really know what they were. Even though Lena had grown up in this world, it was enjoyable discovering the cracks that she’d never considered were there, right along with her. The concept was fascinating, but where a lot of Dystopia’s are primarily about government issues, this was about governmental issues on love. In other words, love takes up a lot of this storyline, and I’m not quite sure how I feel about it. I usually like the romance to take a back-burn or be slow-building—at least in the beginning–but this definitely wasn’t. Be warned, the love in this edged on insta-love, except it was written really well, so well, that I can’t call it insta-love, but it was close.

Just as I thought Lauren Oliver was going to end the series with a lull, there was a massive cliff-hanger ending. I’m ordering the second book tomorrow! Overall, I was captivated by the world and can’t wait to read the next one.

Rating: 4.5 Stars

 

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four-half-stars

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Review: The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey (The Fifth Wave #1)

The Fifth Wave by Rick Yancey
Series: The Fifth Wave #1
Published by Penguin on 7th May 2013
Genres: Dystopia, Young Adult
Pages: 480
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
four-half-stars

The Passage meets Ender’s Game in an epic new series from award-winning author Rick Yancey.

After the 1st wave, only darkness remains. After the 2nd, only the lucky escape. And after the 3rd, only the unlucky survive. After the 4th wave, only one rule applies: trust no one.

Now, it’s the dawn of the 5th wave, and on a lonely stretch of highway, Cassie runs from Them. The beings who only look human, who roam the countryside killing anyone they see. Who have scattered Earth’s last survivors. To stay alone is to stay alive, Cassie believes, until she meets Evan Walker. Beguiling and mysterious, Evan Walker may be Cassie’s only hope for rescuing her brother—or even saving herself. But Cassie must choose: between trust and despair, between defiance and surrender, between life and death. To give up or to get up.

Goodreads link

 

I don’t even know where to start on this review. The 5th Wave is an absolute gem and if you haven’t picked it up yet, I seriously suggest you go and do so right now.

The Earth sees an alien mothership and we try to contact them, but they don’t answer. Then, after ten days of silence, the first wave begins. The Others send out an electromagnetic pulse which takes out all forms of electricity, power, and kills half a million people. The second wave is a tsunami that kills everyone within sixty miles of a coastline, which is three billion people. The third wave is in the form of a plague which had a 97% mortality rate and took out more than 3.5 billion people.

‘Sometimes I think I might be the last human on earth’

Seventeen-year-old Cassie—for Cassiopeia–is alone in the world, camping in the woods while she tries to stay alive and away from the Others. She has a backpack of essentials including a teddybear, a tent and her gun.

‘The first rule of surviving the 4th Wave is don’t trust anyone’

Cassie is such a kick-ass character, she knows that she has to stay alone to survive and she does. Until she meets Evan Walker. It’s the only person she’s talked to in months and she can’t help but enjoy the human contact. Cassie is brave and fights for her right to stay on Earth which I loved. She was so strong and she’s only sixteen. She does what she has to do to survive and she keeps her promises, it was a delight to read from her perspective, despite the fact that she is written by a man.

Cassie’s not the only POV though, we also have a few others, who I will not name for fear of spoiling you all. I actually enjoyed their POV just as much as Cassie’s, and loved that all of their storylines were relevant and interlocked at various points in the book.

Young Adult Dystopian is a genre that’s increasingly growing, especially after the release of The Hunger Games. I even hesitate to say it’s the ‘Next Big Thing’ in terms of Young Adult and ‘mainstream’ books. It’s not surprising then, that this book is all over the blogosphere with people exclaiming how much they enjoyed it. I enjoyed it too. I’m starting to read more Dystopian’s and The Fifth Wave was something that was incredibly satisfying and different to read. The premise was different, the characters I felt were realistic. They all had their lives before the invasion and Yancey wrote flash-backs which made them more relatable.

I found the plot twists to be captivating, I thought I knew what was going on and then Yancey would flip the story upside-down and change my perspective. He was really good at making me doubt myself and sometimes even deliberately confused for me to make me think certain things about the situations and the characters.

Overall, a really enjoyable Dystopian read. If you’re looking for something to read in the Dystopian genre, I suggest you take a look, because I thought it was fantastic. Then I realised the second one comes out in Summer! Next year.

I’m hoping to see Rick Yancey in London soon, but he hasn’t posted where he’s going to do the signing!

Rating: 4.5 Stars

four-half-stars

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Review: Once Burned by Jeaniene Frost

Review: Once Burned by Jeaniene FrostOnce Burned by Jeaniene Frost
Series: Night Prince #1
Published by Avon on July 5th 2012
Genres: Paranormal Romance
Pages: 384
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
four-stars

 

She’s a mortal with dark powers…
After a tragic accident scarred her body and destroyed her dreams, Leila never imagined that the worst was still to come: terrifying powers that let her channel electricity and learn a person’s darkest secrets through a single touch. Leila is doomed to a life of solitude…until creatures of the night kidnap her, forcing her to reach out with a telepathic distress call to the world’s most infamous vampire…
He’s the Prince of Night…
Vlad Tepesh inspired the greatest vampire legend of all—but whatever you do, don’t call him Dracula. Vlad’s ability to control fire makes him one of the most feared vampires in existence, but his enemies have found a new weapon against him—a beautiful mortal with powers to match his own. When Vlad and Leila meet, however, passion ignites between them, threatening to consume them both. It will take everything that they are to stop an enemy intent on bringing them down in flames

Ever since a terrible accident, Leila has been able to see peoples past/present/future and can electrocute them without meaning to- all with a single touch. Having deemed herself a freak, Leila travels with a carnival, performing gymnastics with her Vampire friend Marty. Vampires are the only creatures that can touch Leila and not get hurt when zapped with her electricity. Due to her unusual powers, Leila leads a very isolated life, her mother is dead and she barely talks to her father and sister, she doesn’t really have any friends except Marty. When Vampires capture Leila and force her to use her powers to their advantage, Leila accidently reaches out to the one and only Vlad Tepesh, who’s quite surprised by their telepathic encounter.

“That one tickled. If electrocution is your way of flirting, I commend you on your originality.”

Once Burned was an enjoyable read, with sizzling tension between Leila and Vlad all the way through.  Leila knows exactly how to annoy Vlad and she got under his skin more than most people could. He is an extremely alpha character which I enjoyed. Mostly. He kept on doing things that irked me. Vlad Tepesh is a distinguishable character, he was also very cold, torturing people etc, and this bothered me at times. Leila and Vlad have a lot of arguments because of that. It meant that even though he was badass Vlad The Impaler, I didn’t quite like him as much. He softened up slightly at the end, but he still has a bit to go before I’m completely sold on him. Having said that, he was an amazing character to read about, he had enough mystery about his past that kept me guessing, but was also very distinct in his actions and personality because he had to live up to the legends. The romance between him and Leila was blazing all the way through.

“People frequently bore me, sometimes amuse me, most often irritate me, but rarely intrigue me.”

It appealed to me that Leila was a gymnast, and this connected to certain areas of her personality that were explored, including her past and her powers. It made her more complex and was done sparingly enough not to distract my attention from the main storyline, yet it kept my interest piqued.

Marty and Maximus are both minor characters that add to the book well, as this book mostly revolves around Vlad and Leila. From the Night Huntress series some complain that Jeanine’s Frost’s Cat and Bones’ relationship is fizzling out, this is certainly not the case here. We do get some cameos from Cat and Bones, and it was very amusing to see him from someone else’s perspective, we also see Mencheres and Keira as well.

With a sizzling romance and characters that kept me glued to the pages, I give this a 4.5 Stars

 

[author] [author_image timthumb='on']http://sphotos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/582351_10151339314205489_1547241144_n.jpg[/author_image] [author_info]Tilly Currer is a teenage book geek living in England where she spends her time inside reading because of the abysmal weather. Sometimes, she gets to sit in the sun and read–those are good days. She enjoys strong heroines and hot men, especially werewolves. Fangirling with her friends is one of her favourite hobbies. Comment, tweet, she loves chatting about books and giving/receiving book recommendations[/author_info] [/author]

four-stars

obsidian-cover5 (1)

Review: Obsidian by Jennifer L. Armentrout (Lux #1)

File Size: 399 KB

Print Length: 294 pages

Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1937044238

Publisher: Entangled Teen (May 8, 2012)

ASIN: B00850ZM28

 

When we moved to West Virginia right before my senior year, I’d pretty much resigned myself to thick accents, dodgy internet access, and a whole lot of boring…. until I spotted my hot neighbor, with his looming height and eerie green eyes. Things were looking up.

And then he opened his mouth.

Daemon is infuriating. Arrogant. Stab-worthy. We do not get along. At all. But when a stranger attacks me and Daemon literally freezes time with a wave of his hand, well, something…unexpected happens.
The hot alien living 
next door marks me.
You heard me. Alien. Turns out Daemon and his sister have a galaxy of enemies wanting to steal their abilities, and Daemon’s touch has me lit up like the 
Vega
s Strip. The only way I’m getting out of this alive is by sticking close to Daemon until my alien mojo fades.


I devoured this book. With an interesting premise about light aliens, it’s certainly different from what I’ve read from any paranormal Young Adult before, especially when it comes to love-at-first-sight. Yawn. This was not the case in Obsidian; when Daemon and Katy met, there were undeniable sparks between them, but their eyes were throwing daggers, not dopey looks of love. As a major fan of witty, sarcastic characters, this book delivered on all levels for me. Daemon and Katy have an interesting relationship, one moment they were about to kiss and the next they were about to strangle each other. Katy could stand up for herself and was gutsy, which was a surprise for Daemon, as his super-model looks usually kept dry insults at bay. Katy began to seem fairly shy, and even though I’m not against shy, I do like my fair share of defiant heroines, but I think Daemon brought out the confidence in her simply because he acted like a douche. I enjoyed following Katy’s character, she had a lot I could relate to and a realistic teenage voice, also, she’s a book blogger, why has no one done this before? There were references to certain books in there, and Katy shared my love for comics, graphic novels and paranormal books.


Beautiful face. Beautiful body. Horrible attitude. It was the holy trinity of hot boys.”


With the typical hot but a jerk male character, there is always a fine line between thinking they’re attractive and generally just disliking them. Just as I was beginning to slide into disliking Daemon, Jennifer made me love him and from then on Armentrout had captured my attention. Daemon was very interesting and mysterious and with bonus material showing his points of view at the end of the book, I got to see what he was thinking in various chapters. And boy did I want to know what he was thinking! He is a male bad boy character I really enjoyed and I haven’t read his type so well written in a while. He was hot and witty, although, he was the typical everyone-is-stunned-by-his-beauty type of guy, but I guess that is not uncommon.

Nothing in this book seemed rushed, it was all so nicely paced! I have problems with pace because I’m really picky. I don’t like things going so slow they’re boring, but I also don’t like things –especially romance- moving too fast that it’s unbelievable. Jennifer knew when to pull me in and raise the tension throughout the whole book, and I was entranced.


“Will you show me what you really look like? You don’t sparkle, do you?”


Aliens are a great idea and go into sci-fi realms slightly so I wasn’t really sure what I was going to get here. But it didn’t seem to far-fetched and I found myself enjoying something that was completely fresh and it felt like Jennifer was throwing cool new ideas at me. Really enjoyed that part and hope she’s going to bring her game up in the next book.


I give this an 4.5 Stars Really, really liked this book, certainly recommended if you like bad boys!

Review: Frostbite Graphic Novel by Richelle Mead, Leigh Dragoon and Emma Vieceli

Frostbite Graphic Novel by Emma Vieceli, Leigh Dragoon, Richelle Mead
Series: Vampire Academy Graphic Novels #1
Published by Razorbill on August 23rd 2011
Genres: Paranormal, Young Adult
Pages: 144
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought
four-half-stars



Blurb:

The drama and romance continue in this 144-page full-color graphic novel adaptation of the second Vampire Academy novel, Frostbite, which was overseen by Richelle Mead and features beautiful art by acclaimed British illustrator Emma Vieceli.

As you might know, Richelle Mead’s Vampire Academy series is one of my favourite series, and I was delighted to find out that a graphic novel was being released. It was illustrated by Emma Vieceli and adapted by Leigh Dragoon.

I really liked it, and thought it got the whole gist of Vampire Academy. However, with the graphic novel, you miss certain funny back and forth, or entire conversations that simply make the book. It’s harder to empathize with Rose, because you don’t fully get immersed into her thoughts.Yet, I think that’s simply because it’s a graphic novel and you can’t cram it full, it just needs the important bits.  Leigh Dragoon adapted it very well, and the witty thoughts are still there, making me laugh. It’s a really quick, easy read for someone who wants to catch up with the books but doesn’t have a lot of time.
The drawings are amazing, Dimitri is drawn well…ahem, and the characters are how they are described in the book, Emma Vieceli has clearly worked hard at trying to get everything correct. I found myself getting enraptured with the story again and flying through the pages, I haven’t read the books in a while and this reminded me how much I desperately need to re-visit them.
Overall an 4.5 Stars

four-half-stars