Category Archives: 3 Stars

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Review: The Midnight Dress by Karen Foxlee

Review: The Midnight Dress by Karen FoxleeThe Midnight Dress by Karen Foxlee
Published by Hot Key Books on October 8th 2013
Genres: Contemporary, Mystery, Young Adult
Pages: 288
Format: Paperback
Source: Given From Publisher
Goodreads
three-stars
Quiet misfit Rose doesn't expect to fall in love with the sleepy beach town of Leonora. Nor does she expect to become fast friends with beautiful, vivacious Pearl Kelly, organizer of the high school float at the annual Harvest Festival parade. It's better not to get too attached when Rose and her father live on the road, driving their caravan from one place to the next whenever her dad gets itchy feet. But Rose can't resist the mysterious charms of the town or the popular girl, try as she might.

Pearl convinces Rose to visit Edie Baker, once a renowned dressmaker, now a rumored witch. Together Rose and Edie hand-stitch an unforgettable dress of midnight blue for Rose to wear at the Harvest Festival—a dress that will have long-lasting consequences on life in Leonora, a dress that will seal the fate of one of the girls. Karen Foxlee's breathtaking novel weaves friendship, magic, and a murder mystery into something moving, real, and distinctly original.

*Thank you so much Hot Key Books for this review copy, this in no way affected my review*

The Midnight Dress is very hard for me to describe, because it’s not my usual read. I was really fascinated with the blurb and the whole idea encasing it, so I decided to take the jump and request it. It’s a story about friendship, mystery and things that are not as they seem. First of all, Foxlee’s writing style is probably the most beautiful I’ve read in a while. I have certain preference when it comes to author’s writing; for example, I really don’t like Cassandra Clare’s writing. As much as I love her fantastic world and characters, her description is stuffy and feels like it’s suffocating me. I’m no expert, but I simply want it edited. Anyway, Foxlee’s vivid description is the kind that washes over you when you’re reading it. I also loved the fact that it was set in Australia, which made the description that much more captivating.

It was very different the way Foxlee carried me through the book and let me discover things, about Rose specifically. We learn about her mostly through the story and not through her thoughts, because it’s in a certain style of third person. There’s an incredibly subtle magical element that intrigued me, and weaves in the story quite well.

The thing that I didn’t like was the epic slowness of the book. I can appreciate the build of tension, but Karen Foxlee builds tension throughout practically the whole book, and things aren’t made clear until the very end.

I loved that every chapter is named after a stitch, for example ‘anchor stitch’ and at the beginning of each chapter a little snippet of the ending is revealed. We see the missing person’s case through the detectives eyes, and little pieces of what happens at the end are shown carefully. I thought that was really crafty and well-written. Except, it kept me wanting to know more, and then I felt like the actual chapter itself was a bit anti-climactic and boring. I mostly enjoyed the tension, and the way the characters developed different relationships. So much of the book tells what’s happening to Rose and about everyone else and their antics in the town it seems as if the ending was an afterthought, except it’s always present. I can’t help but feel that doesn’t make sense, but if you read it, hopefully you would understand my ramblings better.

The Midnight Dress is very hard to describe without giving anything at all away, but I can tell you, the ending is a shocker. Foxlee cleverly played against my assumptions and twisted it into something completely different. I was pretty shocked. This is a great read if you like tension, beautiful writing, ambiguity and slow-burning mysteries. It’s not something to read if you want something fast-paced and conventional.

Rating: 3 Stars– I guess it was the slowness that put me off. Nothing really happened for a good portion of the books as everything builds up. However, I did simply adore the writing style and the way the characters relationships developed throughout. I will definitely check more of Foxlee’s books.

three-stars

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Review: After Eden by Helen Douglas (After Eden #1)

Review: After Eden by Helen Douglas (After Eden #1)Aften Eden by Helen Douglas
Series: After Eden #1
Published by Bloomsbury, Bloomsbury Children's on November 7th 2013
Genres: Sci-Fi, Young Adult
Pages: 228
Format: ARC
Source: Given From Publisher
three-stars
Eden Anfield loves puzzles, so when mysterious new boy Ryan Westland shows up at her school she's hooked. On the face of it, he's a typical American teenager. So why doesn't he recognise pizza? And how come he hasn't heard of Hitler? What puzzles Eden the most, however, is the interest he's taking in her.

As Eden starts to fall in love with Ryan, she begins to unravel his secret. Her breakthrough comes one rainy afternoon when she stumbles across a book in Ryan's bedroom - a biography of her best friend - written over fifty years in the future. Confronting Ryan, she discovers that he is there with one unbelievably important purpose ... and she might just have destroyed his only chance of success.

*A review copy was very kindly provided by Bloomsbury Children’s , but this in no way affected the review*

After Eden is written in the perspective of a 16-year-old girl called Eden who starts becoming friends with the new guy in school–deliciously attractive Ryan. Sometimes I found Eden to be a tad one-dimentional. Sure, I related to her in quite a few ways, but she wasn’t the kind of character I admire for her complexity. However, I did like her and thought she was really funny at times.

I don’t want to give out to many spoilers, but Eden starts discovering things about Ryan that don’t add up–he’s never had pizza, and he doesn’t know who Hitler or Ghandi are. Soon she discovers Ryan’s from 100 years into the future and traveled back in time on a mission to save the world.

After Eden was a really intriguing read because I adored the time-travelling aspect of the story. I found it so interesting and I hope Douglas explores this area more in the next installment.  I wasn’t sure I bought that Ryan didn’t know what pizza was or who Hitler or Ghandi were. I understood there was likely to be a colossal culture shock, but they are key people in History and world renown. Surely, there must be some kind of education that informs us who Hitler was 100 years into the future? Of course, we can’t know what happens 100 years from now and I liked the way Douglas kept a mystery about the future and what it held. Eden couldn’t be told about anything because it could change the future and it went against certain laws. This just made me desperate to know more, and I really hope that at some point in this series we will see what becomes of Earth in the future, or be given more information.

I really liked that the romance was not massively insta-love, I had a feeling it was going to be, but thankfully I was proved wrong. I thought Ryan and Eden together were so funny together, but I didn’t feel like their romance had a spark. It was all very cute at times, and Ryan was romantic, but it wasn’t a love I was desperate to see survive. However, I love the trope of forbidden love, and I was interested to see how Eden and Ryan were going to overcome the 100 years that force them apart.

Some things were admittedly quite cliché and predictable. There was a girl antagonist that went to Eden’s school trying to steal the guy. This cheesy plot line usually annoys me a lot, but she played a small role and it didn’t bother me. In fact, it made for entertainment.

It pleased me that the setting was Cornwall! It’s such a lovely place, and it was awesome to read about a UK setting, and people in the same school year as me! There were really nice scenes at the beach and gazing at the stars, and I found the scenes about astronomy especially interesting.

I did really enjoy After Eden, I liked the occasional humour, the setting and the entire idea of  time travelling. However, at times I felt the characters were not complex enough and the romance was lacking in a bit of spark.

Rating: 3 Stars

three-stars

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Review: Lash by L.G. Castillo

Review: Lash by L.G. CastilloLash by L.G. Castillo
Series: Broken Angel #1
on 1st May 2013
Genres: New Adult, Paranormal Romance
Pages: 286
Format: eBook
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
three-stars
Decades after being banished from Heaven for saving a life he shouldn’t have, Lash is given a chance to redeem himself. His mission: protect Naomi Duran, a young woman who has lost her faith. The assignment proves to be anything but simple when his superiors, the Archangels, withhold key information about Naomi and refuse to restore Lash’s powers. When an unexpected source reveals centuries-old secrets, his trust is shaken to the core, and he begins to doubt those whom he had once considered to be his greatest allies.

Determined to avoid anything that would risk his chances of returning to Heaven, Lash struggles with the greatest obstacle of all—his growing feelings for Naomi. But when her life is threatened by an unknown source, Lash questions the wisdom of the Archangels and his ability to keep her safe. 

Soon, Lash will have to choose where to place his faith—in the home he has fought so hard to regain or in the forbidden love he can’t bear to lose.
Buy the Book from Amazon UKBuy the Book from Amazon USA

Lash has a feel of New Adult/ Paranormal and was such a lovely read. It had the premise of Guardian Angels, and forbidden love. Who doesn’t enjoy the trope of forbidden love?

I had not read any New Adult before this–but I kept telling myself to–but because I like Romance and Paranormal, this was really a fantastic combination. It didn’t take me very long to finish and was a light read–which considering that I’ve been in a reading funk for a couple of weeks now was a warm welcome.

Lash was a bit of fun, and humour is present throughout the novel, which blended into what was mostly a rather serious storyline. It’s always good when an author can add humour without completely altering the tone, because I don’t enjoy 100% serious books, I need humour!

The only thing that really let this novel down was that I never fell in love with the characters, and I don’t even know why. Well okay, I did fall for Lash a little bit–but who wouldn’t? There was great internal and external conflict, Castillo has clearly tried to give layers to the characters and Lash had an intriguing mystery past. But still, they weren’t the kind of characters that made you snort with laughter and want to eat ice cream with them in the wee hours of the morning.

Even though I didn’t fall in love with Naomi’s character, I still liked her. Anyone who has dealt with loss and grieving can relate to Naomi’s character. She lost her mother to cancer, then other events happen that add to the loss. I felt like some things were unexpected and unrealistic, though. I don’t want to give out spoilers, but she gets a little depressed at one point, and what happened next seemed like it was just written in to make the story more interesting/easier for the storyline. Not actually because it fit with Naomi’s character.

Either way, Lash was an enjoyable read, and although it wasn’t jaw-dropping or heart-stopping, Lash and Naomi were fun characters, and the Guardian Angels storyline was really intriguing. This novel was at times cheesy and I felt melodramatic, but still a great read.

Rating: 3 Stars

three-stars

This Northern Sky

Review: This Northern Sky by Julia Green

This Northern Sky by Julia Green
Published by Bloomsbury, Bloomsbury Children's on July 4th 2013
Genres: Contemporary, Young Adult
Pages: 230
Format: Paperback
Source: Given From Publisher
three-stars

  • Source: Bloomsbury–thank you very much, this in no way affected my honest review!
  • Goodreads
  • Amazon UK
  • Kate’s parents are taking her on holiday with them to a cottage on a remote island in the Hebrides. Kate can’t imagine anything more boring. But underneath her sulkiness, Kate is scared. Her parents have been fighting and she knows that for her parents this holiday is make or break. Once at the cottage, Kate escapes – outside, anywhere. And there she meets the warmth of the islanders, who are prepared to accept her and to listen to her. And possibly fall in love with her . . 

I was expecting a sweet YA chick lit when I picked this up, and I think the synopsis is very misleading. It says ‘And there she meets the islanders, who are prepared to accept her and listen to her. And possibly fall in love with her.’ Emphasis on the word Possibly, because actually, it’s quite clear 1/3 of the way through, that’s never going to happen. They love her, but nobody falls in love with her, which I was disappointed with. However, this is a YA novel, and the focus wasn’t particularly on Kate’s love life, but making new friends and noticing her parents that are growing apart. It was also very nice to read some UKYA!

Other than that, This Northern Sky by Julia Green was rather enjoyable, and quite a small, easy read. It didn’t take me long to finish, because this isn’t an action book or anything, it’s a quick contemporary.

A lot of teenagers could relate to This Northern Sky because Kate faces her parents rocky relationship, and turns to the solitude of the island to keep her centred. There were many questions asked wondering if Kate was to blame herself or if things were different, could her parents still love each other? I really liked the idea of leaving everything behind and finding new friends, and there was a quote in it that was my favourite, and very true:

‘You have to think about why people move over here,’ Isla says. ‘Quite often they’re running away from something. People who aren’t so good at getting on with others, they don’t understand how a real community works.’ She laughs. ‘They forget that they bring themselves with them, where ever they run.’

This was not the deepest or grittiest of books, for me. However it’s a great book for teenagers with divorced/divorcing parents to relate to, and quite a touching novel in that respect.

The ending was nice, and left me satisfied, but it didn’t leave me with a huge imprint. Overall, I’m going to give it 3 Stars.

three-stars

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Review: Half-Blood by Jennifer L. Armentrout (Covenant #1)

Half-Blood by Jennifer L. Armentrout
Series: Covenant #1
Published by Spencer Hill Press on 15 December 2011
Genres: Paranormal, Young Adult
Pages: 281
Format: eBook
Source: Bought
three-stars

GoodreadsAmazon UK

I honestly don’t know how to start this review. I am a die-hard Vampire Academy fan, always have been since the moment I read it. Therefore, reading Half-Blood makes me a touch defensive, why you ask? Because it’s exactly the same.

Okay that’s a lie, it’s not. But it’s pretty damn close. Instead of the premise of Moroi and Strigoi, it’s about God’s. It’s like all the major events in one series of Vampire Academy, condensed into one book. If you like Vampire Academy, you’ll most definitely like this, I did. But I couldn’t shake the feeling as I read it that it was copied. Then I found my mind wondering into how far this is on the edge of copyright. I chose to read this book because I love Jennifer L. Armentrout’s other series, I obviously still do. However, I’m not too happy about this book.

I started reading it knowing it was going to be alike, as I heard from word of mouth and other reviews. I really liked Alex and her kickass nature, but I don’t think she even matched up to Rose. She didn’t have the right feistiness for me. Rose is irresponsible for the first half, jumping into things, but she makes a conscious decision to stop, and she mostly does. I felt like Alex made the decision, yet didn’t carry through with it. Aiden and Seth are both sexy, funny characters. But they don’t match up to Dimitri and Adrian, at all.

By copying a lot of details from VA, she’s made me compare the two, which wasn’t something I was comfortable with. This is because I’m extremely biased towards VA. Having said that, there is no doubt VA is better, despite my biased position.

The plot did have the elements I love: just the right amount of romance, not too much, not too little. It also had a strong, intriguing heroine, and other fun characters. Aiden was mysterious and a bit broken—not that he would ever admit it. The plot was about God’s, they don’t play much of a part in this one, but I’m sure their part will grow in the next couple of books. There was also another magical element thrown in, which I really liked, which considered Seth and Alex. I really want to know how this pans out.

I will be reading the next book, because I’ve heard how the series completely changes and diverts from VA, which I’ll be pleased to see considering that I enjoyed the potential so much.

Rating: 3 Stars: Overall, interesting, funny characters, and an entertaining plot, unfortunately, it was too much like Vampire Academy for me to love it completely.

three-stars

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Review: Dead Ever After by Charlaine Harris (Sookie Stackhouse #13)

Dead Ever After by Charlaine Harris
Series: Sookie Stackhouse #13
Published by Gollancz on 7th May 2013
Genres: Paranormal Romance
Pages: 352
Format: eBook
Source: Bought
three-stars

There are secrets in the town of Bon Temps, ones that threaten those closest to Sookie—and could destroy her heart….

Sookie Stackhouse  finds it easy to turn down the request of former barmaid Arlene when she wants her job back at Merlotte’s. After all, Arlene tried to have Sookie killed. But her relationship with Eric Northman is not so clearcut. He and his vampires are keeping their distance…and a cold silence. And when Sookie learns the reason why, she is devastated.Then a shocking murder rocks Bon Temps, and Sookie is arrested for the crime.
But the evidence against Sookie is weak, and she makes bail. Investigating the killing, she’ll learn that what passes for truth in Bon Temps is only a convenient lie. What passes for justice is more spilled blood. And what passes for love is never enough…

A lot of people did not enjoy the conclusion to the Sookie Stackhouse series, some people hated who Sookie ended up with or the book altogether. I thought Harris did a good job at concluding a lot of loose ends with the minor and important characters, as most of the characters were given a cameo in the book. However, all of the cameo’s seemed quite forced and random, I think Charlaine could have done that with more finesse. Considering how many characters there are in this series, not every character was highlighted, but she didn’t miss out anyone important to me.

Now let’s get down to what everyone has been kicking up a fuss about. Who Sookie ends up with. For those of you who don’t know, Sookie Stackhouse is known for her many love interests, but has kept Eric for some time. I’m not going to spoil it, but I was extremely happy with who she ended up with– just not how Charlaine Harris executed it. I don’t know why she took so long to write Sookie’s romantic happy ending, and it almost felt like a frantic pick of a random character, and that she didn’t even know until this book, who it would be. I would rather have had a slower build-up of the relationship over time in a couple of books, than what felt like a rushed ending in one.

I did enjoy it though, but it wasn’t the best in the series, and even though there was a happy ending, I felt it was quite melancholic for some reason. After all that Sookie went through in the series, I wanted a proper walk-into-the-sunset ending, which wasn’t there for me.

The plot was interesting, it got to a point where I didn’t want to put it down because I was intrigued, however not because I was gripped. I’m fully invested in the characters after reading about them for so many books, and that’s what makes this series so enjoyable. Nevertheless, once again the plot revolves around Sookie. It’s all about people wanting to wrong her and destroy her–as it always is–which I find rather tiresome.

I enjoyed it a lot more than other people seemed to, but the ending felt rushed and I wasn’t so keen on the plotline. Once again, the characters are what kept me entertained.

Rating: God knows. 3 Stars.

three-stars

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Review: Elixir Bound by Katie L. Carroll

Elixir Bound by Katie L. Caroll
Published by Self-Published on August 28th 2012
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult
Pages: 176
Format: eBook
Source: Given From Author
three-stars

 

  • Print Length: 176 pages
  • Publisher: MuseItUp Publishing
  • Published: 28 Aug 2012
  • ASIN: B0093CL4OM

Carroll has created an intricate fantasy world that is completely different from the usual books I read. Katora and her family live on a farm with her younger brother and sister, and their parents. Katora knows that she is going to inherit the farm and work there when she grows older. What she doesn’t know is that her father has the ability to heal people with a special Elixir plant. For many years and generations, one person in her family has had that plant at their fingertips, but when the Kase family need it most, there is none left. Katora and her companions must set off in search of her family’s Elixir, where it grows in the form of a plant. But, not only does she need to find the plant, she also needs to make the decision whether to become the next Kase healer and change the rest of her life’s course. She sets off on the journey with her younger brother and sister—Bhar and Kylene; a trusted family friend–Palafair, and Hirsten—a handsome boy who intrigues Katora and is the son of the powerful mapmaker.

Elixir Bound ‘s world is what I’d call historical fantasy, it’s not set in modern times and it didn’t seem to have modern technology. I enjoyed learning about this world and the quirky things it had. The idea of the maps was really interesting, you can put memories into it and people can watch them. Never before has Hirsten been able to put a memory in the map, it was always his father’s memories people saw, however, Hirsten and Katora realise there’s a connection between them that is more than initial attraction, that involves the maps, and I’m excited to see where that goes. In addition, the storm messages were creative, I’ve never read about anything like that before. People could send messages manipulating the weather to warn others.

The small anni demicks and tilli demick were really cute, they’re about up to humans knees and supposedly are servants, except the Kase family have been treating Palafair as part of the family for years. I don’t want to spoil anyone, but it’s adorable when Palafair dotes on a certain tilli demick.

I liked the horsemen, who were like Yeselda’s powerful minions, however, the antagonist didn’t really infuse me with fear, or make me scared for the characters. I found her slightly disappointing because she didn’t really have an effect on me either way.

Katora was to me, a very realistic character because she was faulted. She was strong, and independent, perfectly capable of being the leader of the group and always protecting people. But, she didn’t seem to be able to get close to anyone—especially Hirsten—which made for fantastic character development throughout the book and hopefully more in the series. It gave her the chance to grow, because on the journey, I felt like she changed a lot and became more mature, she more likely to let other people lead, yet still be able to lead well herself.

I didn’t find the love convincing enough, I’m glad it wasn’t insta-love and that Katora had her own battle about how she felt about him, but I never felt like they had enough tense/sweet/angry conversations, to be in love. I wanted more emotion from them, or something. That’s slightly unfair, because they travel for many months and then fall in love. However, I didn’t get that feeling from Katora; she spent so long trying to figure out what the feelings were, that her sudden realisation at love didn’t seem plausible. I wanted to see more of a connection or tension between the two characters. This was particularly disappointing because they were cute together in the small snippets I read and Hirsten was so sweet.

I enjoyed the intricate world, and Katora was strong and I felt she grew a lot, especially at the end. I did have a slight problem with Yeselda and I wasn’t as convinced by the love as I wanted to be, but I enjoyed the overall story and the characters and though it was an entertaining read.

Rating: 3 Stars

Buy at Amazon.co.uk

Buy at Amazon.com

[author] [author_image timthumb='on']http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-KMMnLncRqIw/UEgsVsrtniI/AAAAAAAADUo/Ba4HkwWoCJY/s1600/KatieLCarroll.jpg[/author_image] [author_info]About Katie: Katie Carroll began writing after her 16-year-old sister unexpectedly passed away. Writing was a way for Katie to help her sister live on in the pages of a story. It also made her realize that she wanted to pursue writing as a career. In addition to penning novels for teens and kids, she edits novels, plays soccer, and collects signed copies of books. Katie lives in Connecticut with her husband and son. If you would like to know more about Katie, visit her website: http://www.katielcarroll.com/[/author_info] [/author]

three-stars

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Review: Other Side Of Forever by Shannon Eckrich

Other Side of Forever by Shannon Eckrich
Published by Self-Published on 24th January 2012
Genres: Paranormal, Romance, Young Adult
Pages: 236
Format: eBook
Source: Given From Author
three-stars

Other Side of Forever

Seventeen-year-old Allie Anderson’s telekinetic powers are anything but useful-she can’t bring her father back, can’t stop her mother’s downward spiral into alcohol, and can’t keep her from falling in love with Ethan Bradley. Loving Ethan is easy, but it comes with a hefty price: Ethan is prohibited by his people from interacting with mortals–because he isn’t mortal himself. When Allie and Ethan’s love is discovered, there’s someone who will do anything to keep them apart. If Allie can’t learn to control her powers and fight to save Ethan, this dark entity will make every attempt to stop her beating heart. And if that happens, not even the energy of an immortal can bring her back.

I’d like to start by saying thank you Shannon for giving me this book to review. The Other Side Of Forever had a very original  premise and if you’re sick of the constant vampire/werewolf books being churned out, I recommend this one. The concept of mortals and immortals was refreshing.
The telekinetic powers attracted me because it was unique; Allie hates her powers and can’t manipulate them easily, she has kept this secret hidden and whenever she gets emotional, her powers get out-of-control. I liked the idea of energy and how she could control certain objects, this made for a more entertaining read. Allie’s problems at home gave her a believable background and many teenagers could relate to this. It also gave another layer to her character and made her more complex. She had a hard time loving Ethan, because she’d gotten hurt before, so at the beginning she pushes him away. This angst was great and I thought the build-up to their first kiss was nicely paced. Sadly, as the book progresses, I thought they fell in love too quickly to be believable as I felt they barely knew each other. This ruined the romance slightly for me, as their professing love for each other seemed a little silly.
The bad guy’s bravado was poor, he didn’t infuse me with fear for the characters, no matter how powerful he supposedly was. The climax at the end was good, especially because I always like a bad guy that has a past and reasons for his actions, but it was a bit of an information dump at the end, and he sounded like a bad cartoon character. 
I had problems with Allie being saved a lot- she was saved by Ethan on numerous occasions. All of those times she didn’t even try to save herself and that bothered me. I realise she is a character a lot of teenage girls would like though, because she is very passive and could be easily related-to, but she was too passive for me. I think this might be deliberate to make her stronger throughout the series, at least I hope so because I liked the twist at the end and it seemed to be the beginning of her character development.
Ethan was a great male character, I can see a lot of girls fangirling over him. He grabbed me from the moment when he simply sat down and read a book- guys reading books are hot. He had a certain type of mystery surrounding him that made him more alluring and his past was an interesting back story.
There was also a strong balance between plot and romance, with puzzling occurrences in the beginning that lead to hair-raising conclusions in the end.
Overall, it was a great debut novel and even though I had some problems, it had characters that were easily related-to, an original premise, and I’m looking forward to the next in the series.

I give this a 3 Stars

three-stars

Review: Morrigan: trials of a teenage witch by Amanda McKeon

Morrigan: trials of a teenage witch by Amanda McKeon
Published by Self-Published on November 27th 2012
Genres: Paranormal, Young Adult
Format: eBook
Source: Given From Author
three-stars

Morrigan: trials of a teenage witch

Blurb: 
Morrigan Reilly, or Mo, is a lucky girl and she knows it, but something’s bugging her and she can’t pinpoint what it is. Disconnected from her friends since returning to school, and all but invisible to the guy she likes, things just go from bad to worse when she accidentally puts a hex on someone she loves. What Mo doesn’t know is that she’s a witch, descended from the great Celtic goddess, The Morrigan, queen of battle and strife. Mo’s life is about to get a lot more complicated, and she’ll learn the true meaning of that old adage, ‘Be careful what you wish for’…


Amanda emailed me last week and asked me to review her YA book, and having previously heard about the Morrigan before, I was curious so I accepted. It’s about a normal 17-18 year-old girl who lives in Ireland, called Morrigan. She discovers her powers as a witch descended from the Celtic goddess- The Morrigan queen of battle and strife. Morrigan has never before taken ‘be careful what you wish for’ so close to heart until now.
Morrigan seemed to go through a lot in this book and I really empathised for her, but felt her character wasn’t complex enough. This book is written in the third person yet I never really connected with her for some reason. She didn’t have enough of a individual character for me and I never rooted for her as much as I wanted to. I agreed with most of the decisions she made, I just didn’t have enough to relate to. I enjoyed her character, especially in the end chapters, because she seemed like a realistic teenager and I’d really like to see her powers and her character develop in the next book.
I felt the same about most of the characters, as they are something I really analyse when reading. They’re just missing that spark needed to make a really good bunch of main characters. Other than that, I found myself liking all of them, just not loving them.

I thought the beginning of this book was going to be eye-roll worthy, as in the second scene Robbie asks Mo out and she’s left excited about this dream date. However, Amanda surprised me in that aspect, and as I realised what was actually going on in the romance department, I rejoiced. I really liked the guy she picked, and he came across really nicely for the first book, I just thought it was incredibly rushed. As soon as they’d had their first date, they were talking seriously about a relationship. I think the build-up could have been much more intense, and give us chance to see if the reader actually likes him! I hadn’t even decided if I liked the main heroine and if I wanted her to have the best possible guy yet. It happened too rapidly, and if we’d found out more about him, we could have fallen in love with him easier. It was a shame, because I really liked him.
The main storyline was nicely done for a first book. I think the first book is always setting up the series by showing the rules and whatnot.  It had a nice balance between romance and actual plot, and  we find out Morrigan’s powers along with her. What Morrigan can specifically do is unknown by just about everyone, and I liked the mystery, I just wonder if random powers are going to crop up all over the place at convenient times. She can scry, and animals seem attached to her which was amusing. I found myself laughing at the antics Morrigan used her powers for when she’d first discovered them, and was glad that she didn’t use them too recklessly and immaturely. I was genuinely surprised by the ending, I wonder where in the storyline that’s going to be used and hope it will give another layer. I thought that Morrigan was a realistic teenager when she didn’t do much self-defence in this book, and I can see her powers growing interestingly.
The worst problem for me, had to be the editing. This is a self-published book and the typos were pretty bad. There were too many and this had an effect on the overall rating.

 I enjoyed the mythology used and the overall book was interesting and a nice read.
I give this 3 Stars


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three-stars